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  • Comparative Studies in Society and History, Volume 54, Issue 3
  • July 2012, pp. 592-611

Slave Cocoa and Red Rubber: E. D. Morel and the Problem of Ethical Consumption

  • Jonathan E. Robins (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0010417512000242
  • Published online: 13 July 2012
Abstract
Abstract

Over the last two decades, consumption, consumerism, and the idea of consumer agency have attracted a great deal attention from scholars across a number of disciplines. Among historians, the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have been identified as a crucial period for consumption, one in which consumers emerged as an influential group of political, economic, and social agents. Historians of the English-speaking world have advanced bold claims about the prominence and impact of consumers during this period. Consumer movements were conspicuously absent in two major scandals of the early twentieth century, however. This article uses these commodity-centered cases—of rubber in the Congo Free State, and cocoa in the Portuguese colonies of São Tomé and Príncipe—to question the salience of “consumerism” in turn-of-the-century political thought. By tracing the career of British journalist and humanitarian activist E. D. Morel through the “red rubber” and “slave cocoa” scandals, the article demonstrates that consumers were only one of many influences along the commodity chain of production and consumption.

Copyright
Corresponding author
jonathan.robins@rochester.edu
Linked references
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Tim Lang and Yiannis Gabriel , “A Brief History of Consumer Activism,” in Rob Harrison , Terry Newholm , and Deirdre Shaw , eds., The Ethical Consumer (London and New York: Sage Publications, 2005), 3954

Lawrence Glickman , Buying Power: A History of Consumer Activism in America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009)

C. Dellheim , “The Creation of a Company Culture: Cadburys, 1861–1931,” American Historical Review 92, 1 (1987): 4344

K. Dike Nworah , “The Politics of Lever's West African Concessions, 1907–1913,” The International Journal of African Historical Studies 5, 2 (1972): 248–63

Michael Freeden , Liberalism Divided: A Study in British Political Thought, 1914–1939 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986), 51

Robert C. Reinders , “Racialism on the Left: E. D. Morel and the ‘Black Horror on the Rhine,’International Review of Social History 13, 1 (1968): 128

Niels Fold , “Restructuring of the European Chocolate Industry and Its Impact on Cocoa Production in West Africa,” Journal of Economic Geography 1, 4 (2001): 405–20

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Comparative Studies in Society and History
  • ISSN: 0010-4175
  • EISSN: 1475-2999
  • URL: /core/journals/comparative-studies-in-society-and-history
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