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Gyrification and neural connectivity in schizophrenia

  • Tonya White (a1) (a2) and Claus C. Hilgetag (a3) (a4)
Abstract
Abstract

There is emerging evidence for a connection between the surface morphology of the brain and its underlying connectivity. The foundation for this relationship is thought to be established during brain development through the shaping influences of tension exerted by viscoelastic nerve fibers. The tension-based morphogenesis results in compact wiring that enhances efficient neural processing. Individuals with schizophrenia present with multiple symptoms that can include impaired thought, action, perception, and cognition. The global nature of these symptoms has led researchers to explore a more global disruption of neuronal connectivity as a theory to explain the vast array of clinical and cognitive symptoms in schizophrenia. If cerebral function and form are linked through the organization of neural connectivity, then a disruption in neural connectivity may also alter the surface morphology of the brain. This paper reviews developmental theories of gyrification and the potential interaction between gyrification and neuronal connectivity. Studies of gyrification abnormalities in children, adolescents, and adults with schizophrenia demonstrate a relationship between disrupted function and altered morphology in the surface patterns of the cerebral cortex. This altered form may provide helpful clues in understanding the neurobiological abnormalities associated with schizophrenia.

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Corresponding author
Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Tonya White, Afdeling Kinder-en Jeugdpsychiatrie, Erasmus Medical Centre, Sophia, kamer wk219, Postbus 2060, Rotterdam 3000 CB, The Netherlands; E-mail: t.white@erasmusmc.nl.
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

V. Braitenberg , & A. Schüz (1998). Cortex: Statistics and geometry of neuronal connectivity. Berlin: Springer.

W. Welker (1990). Why does cerebral cortex fissure and fold. In E. G. Jones & A. Peters (Eds.), Cerebral cortex (pp. 3136). New York: Plenum Press.

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Development and Psychopathology
  • ISSN: 0954-5794
  • EISSN: 1469-2198
  • URL: /core/journals/development-and-psychopathology
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