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GAME THEORY: A PRACTITIONER'S APPROACH

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2010

Thomas C. Schelling*
Affiliation:
University of Maryland

Abstract

To a practitioner in the social sciences, game theory primarily helps to identify situations in which interdependent decisions are somehow problematic; solutions often require venturing into the social sciences. Game theory is usually about anticipating each other's choices; it can also cope with influencing other's choices. To a social scientist the great contribution of game theory is probably the payoff matrix, an accounting device comparable to the equals sign in algebra.

Type
Essay
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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References

REFERENCES

Allison, G. T. 1971. Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis. 2nd edn, with Philip Zelikow, 1999. Boston: Little, Brown & Co.Google Scholar
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Camerer, C. F. 2003. Behavioral Game Theory. Princeton, NJ: Russell Sage Foundation, Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Luce, R. D. and Raiffa, H. 1957. Games and Decisions. New York: John Wiley and Sons.Google Scholar
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Schelling, T. C. 1984. Choice and Consequence. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Searle, J. R. 1969. Speech Acts. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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