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Special issue on support strategies in language variation and change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 October 2016

BRITTA MONDORF
Affiliation:
Department of English and Linguistics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Jakob-Welder-Weg 18, 55128 Mainz, Germanymondorf@uni-mainz.de
JAVIER PÉREZ-GUERRA
Affiliation:
Department of English, French and German, University of Vigo, FFT. Campus Universitario, E–36310 Vigo, Spainjperez@uvigo.es

Abstract

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Introduction
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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