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English Language & Linguistics
  • ISSN: 1360-6743 (Print), 1469-4379 (Online)
  • Editors: Professor Laurel J. Brinton University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada , Dr Patrick Honeybone University of Edinburgh, UK and Professor Bernd Kortmann University of Freiburg, Germany
  • Editorial board
English Language and Linguistics, published three times a year, is an international journal which focuses on the description of the English language within the framework of contemporary linguistics. The journal is concerned equally with the synchronic and the diachronic aspects of English language studies and publishes articles of the highest quality which make a substantial contribution to our understanding of the structure and development of the English language and which are informed by a knowledge and appreciation of linguistic theory. English Language and Linguistics carries articles and short discussion papers or squibs on all core aspects of English, from its beginnings to the present day, including syntax, morphology, phonology, semantics, pragmatics, corpus linguistics and lexis. There is also a major review section including, from time to time, articles that give an overview of current research in particular specialist areas. Occasional issues are devoted to a special topic, when a guest editor is invited to commission articles from leading specialists in the field.

Recently published articles




Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • “Analysing English Sentences” – A. Radford
  • 28 March 2017, James McKellar
  • By Susan E. Holt My love affair (and it really is love) with linguistics began back as a nine year old watching “My Fair Lady” for the first time.  After the initial romance, it was time to make a serious commitment and that came in the form of saying “I do” to a university place at Durham studying English Language and Linguistics.  This marriage was solemnized in the presence of a holy book: “Analysing English Sentences” by Andrew Radford. So my venture into the book began in the first week of university.  The heaviest of all  the books on our booklist, myself and my new linguistics friends quickly (and correctly) figured it must be important.  During first year syntax, the red book was . . . → Read More: “Analysing English Sentences” – A. Radford...
  • Tasks, methodological transparency and the IRIS database of research materials
  • 20 March 2017, Charlotte Cox
  • Commentary by Emma Marsden, University of York and Margaret Borowczyk, Georgetown University IRIS is a repository of instruments used in second language research. It was created to increase access to the variety of materials used to elicit data for empirical studies (e.g. pictures, participant instructions, language tests, response options, working memory tests, videos, software scripts). These materials are so often left out of research reports, mainly due to publishers’ space constraints. IRIS allows consumers to more directly evaluate the validity of certain research and improves the speed and accuracy of replication research.  It is a free, theory agnostic, database that is searchable across over one hundred different search criteria (such as ‘type of instrument’, ‘research area’, or ‘language’). IRIS currently holds more . . . → Read More: Tasks, methodological transparency and the IRIS database of research materials...