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Introducing conversational grammar in EFL: a case for hedging strings

Bringing insights from corpus linguistics and construction grammar into the English language classroom

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 May 2014

Extract

The influence of corpus-based grammars has been pervasive in the past two decades in language learning as an important reference for researchers, teachers, and language enthusiasts alike. Yet such advances in the compilation of large digitized samples of language have not yet resulted in many practical implementations in EFL contexts. This is certainly due to the reluctance of many teachers to introduce corpora into their practice, in the belief that such a shift is technically cumbersome and time-consuming (Boulton 2010). I shall take up this issue in the last section of this paper.

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Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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