Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59df476f6b-f4krk Total loading time: 0.344 Render date: 2021-05-18T03:11:38.995Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Deforestation and land use under insecure property rights*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2009

GREGORY S. AMACHER
Affiliation:
Department of Forestry, College of Natural Resources, 304D Cheatham Hall, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA. Email: gamacher@vt.edu
ERKKI KOSKELA
Affiliation:
Department of Economics, University of Helsinki, Finland
MARKKU OLLIKAINEN
Affiliation:
Department of Economics and Management, University of Helsinki, Finland
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We examine the implications of migration and insecure property rights to land use and deforestation in tropical frontier forests. Three forms of property rights risks are introduced to basic land-use forms. Illegal logging risk is associated with forest plantations, a land expropriation risk affects land in agriculture and plantation forestry, and illegal logging risks threaten native forest land. Public and private landowners can reduce these risks by employing costly enforcement effort. We show how that migration, expropriation, and illegal logging risks lead to deforestation by promoting agricultural expansion, and illegal logging. Higher public enforcement reduces illegal logging, but higher private enforcement may or may not reduce deforestation depending on migration pressures. Higher timber prices have an ambiguous effect on deforestation, but an increasing value of non-timber benefits decreases or leaves deforestation unchanged depending on the incentive structures of illegal loggers.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Albers, H., Fisher, A., and Hanemann, M. (1996), ‘Valuation and management of tropical forests: implications for uncertainty and irreversibility’, Environmental and Resource Economics 8: 3961.Google Scholar
Alston, L., Libecap, G., and Mueller, B. (2000), ‘Land reform policies, the sources of violent conflict, and implications for deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon’, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 39: 162188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Amacher, G., Koskela, E., and Ollikainen, M. (2007), ‘Royalty reform and illegal reporting of harvest volumes under alternative penalty schemes’, Environmental and Resource Economics 38: 189211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Angelson, A. (1999), ‘Agricultural expansion and deforestation: modeling the impact of population, market forces, and property rights’, Journal of Development Economics 58: 185218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Angelson, A. and Kaimowitz, D. (1999), ‘Rethinking the causes of deforestation: lessons from economic models’, The World Bank Research Observer 14: 7398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anon, (2007), ‘Illegal loggers to face justice’, Illegal-logging.info, http://www.illegal-logging.info/news.php?newsId=1854Google Scholar
Armsberg, J. (1998), ‘Economic parameters of deforestation’, World Bank Economic Review 12: 133153.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbier, E., Bockstael, N., Burgess, J., and Strand, I. (1995), ‘The linkages between timber trade and tropical deforestation’,The World Economy 18: 411442.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbier, E. and Burgess, J. (1997), ‘The economics of tropical forest land use options’, Land Economics 73: 174195.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbier, E. and Burgess, J. (2001a), ‘The dynamics of tropical deforestation’, Journal of Economic Surveys 15: 413433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barbier, E. and Burgess, J. (2001b), ‘Tropical deforestation, tenure insecurity and unsustainability’, Forest Science 47: 497509.Google Scholar
Barreto, P., Amaral, P., Vidal, E., and Uhl, C. (1998), ‘Costs and benefits of forest management for timber production in eastern Amazonia’, Forest Ecology and Management 108: 926.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blaser, J. and Douglas, J. (2000), ‘A future for forests? Issues and implications for the emerging forest policy and strategy of the World Bank’, ITTO Tropical Forest Update 10: 914.Google Scholar
Bohn, H. and Deacon, R. (2000), ‘Ownership risk, investment, and the use of natural resources’, American Economic Review 90: 526549.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boscolo, M. and Vincent, J.R. (2000), ‘Promoting better logging practices in tropical forests: a simulation analysis of alternative regulations’, Land Economics 76: 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chomitz, K. and Gray, D. (1996), ‘Roads, land use, and deforestation: a spatial model applied to Belize’, World Bank Economic Review 10: 487512.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clarke, H.R., Reed, W.J., and Shestra, R.M. (1993), ‘Optimal enforcement of property rights on developing country forests subject to illegal logging’, Resource and Energy Economics 15: 271293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Contreras-Hermosilla, A. (2000), ‘The underlying causes of forest decline’, CIFOR Occasional Paper #30, June, 29 pp.Google Scholar
FAO (2005), State of the World's Forests 2005, Rome: Food and Agricultural Organization.Google Scholar
Hardie, I. and Parks, P. (1997), ‘Land use with heterogeneous land quality: an application of an area base model’, American Journal of Agricultural Economics 79: 299310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hotte, L. (2005), ‘Natural-resource exploitation with costly enforcement of property rights’, Oxford Economic Papers 57: 497521.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hyde, W., Amacher, G., and Magrath, W. (1996), ‘Deforestation and forest land use: theory, evidence, and policy implications’, World Bank Research Observer 11: 223248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
International Tropical Trade Organization (ITTO) (2005), ‘Status of tropical forest management: summary report, a special edition of the Tropical Forest Update’, ITTO Tropical Forest Update 16: (2006).Google Scholar
Johnson, S. (2002), ‘Documenting the undocumented’, ITTO Tropical Forest Update 12: 614.Google Scholar
Kaimowitz, D. (1996), Livestock and Deforestation: Central America in the 1980s and 1990s: A Policy Perspective, CIFOR, 95 pp.Google Scholar
Lichtenberg, E. (1989), ‘Land quality, irrigation development, and cropping patterns in the northern high plains’, American Journal of Agricultural Economics 71: 187194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mendelsohn, R. (1994), ‘Property rights and tropical deforestation’, Oxford Economic Papers 46: 750756.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parks, P., Barbier, E., and Burgess, J. (1998), ‘The economics of forest use in temperate and tropical areas’, Environmental and Resource Economics 11: 473487.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reed, W. (1984) ‘The effects of the risk of fire on the optimal rotation of a forest’, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 11: 180190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shively, G.E. (2002), ‘Agricultural change, rural labor markets, and forest clearing: an illustrative case from the Philippines’, Land Economics 77: 268284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shively, G.E. and Pagiola, S. (2004), ‘Agricultural intensification, local labor markets, and deforestation in the Philippines’, Environment and Development Economics 9: 241266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, W. (2002), ‘The global problem of illegal logging’, ITTO Tropical Forest Update 12: 35.Google Scholar
van Kooten, G.C., Sedjo, R.A., and Bulte, E.H. (1999), ‘Tropical deforestation: issues and policies,’ in Folmer, H. and Tietenberg, T. (eds), The International Yearbook of Environmental and Resource Economics 1999/2000, pp. 199–248.Google Scholar
Wibowo, D. and Byron, N. (1999), ‘Deforestation mechanisms: a survey’, International Journal of Social Economics 26: 455474.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Winkler, N. (1997), ‘Environmentally sound forest harvesting: testing the applicability of the Fao model code in the Amazon of Brazil’, Case Study 8, FAO, Rome.Google Scholar
Zhang, D. (2001), ‘Faustmann in an uncertain policy environment’, Forest Policy and Economics 2: 203210.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Deforestation and land use under insecure property rights*
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Deforestation and land use under insecure property rights*
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Deforestation and land use under insecure property rights*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *