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Inducing the adoption of conservation technologies: lessons from the Ecuadorian Andes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2004

PAUL WINTERS
Affiliation:
Department of Economics, American University, 203 Roper Hall, Washington, DC, 20016 USA. Tel: (202) 885 3792. Fax (202) 885 3790.
CHARLES C. CRISSMAN
Affiliation:
International Potato Center (CIP), Sub-saharan Africa Regional Office, Box 25171, Nairobi, 00603 Kenya
PATRICIO ESPINOSA
Affiliation:
International Potato Center (CIP), Santa Catalina Experimental Station, Quito, Ecuador

Abstract

Programs that provide incentives to induce conservation are often ineffective, leading farmers to abandon conservation once assistance is withdrawn. An alternative to incentives is to offer conservation technologies in conjunction with measures that enhance the short-term profitability of agriculture. Our results indicate that CARE, an international non-governmental organization, has used this approach successfully to promote resource conservation in the Ecuadorian Andes. In particular, the adoption of terraces was found to increase significantly when accompanied by alterations to the agricultural system, such as new crops, biological barriers, and improved agricultural production.

Type
Research Articles
Copyright
© 2004 Cambridge University Press

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