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The linkages between property rights, migration, and productivity: the case of Kajiado District, Kenya

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 September 2003

Jane Kabubo-Mariara
Affiliation:
Economics Department, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30197, Nairobi. Email: jmariara@uonbi.ac.kejkmariara@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study investigates the relationship between property rights, resource degradation, and productivity among herders in semi-arid regions of Kenya using survey data. Binary and conditional logit models are used to explain migration, while ordinary least squares and fixed effects models are used to explain productivity. The main findings of the study are that private property right regimes discourage migration with livestock, while private property right regimes and migration increase productivity. The study recommends that if privatization is not feasible, then the existing common rights system should be strengthened through promotion of collective action and limiting of group sizes.

Type
Theory and Applications
Copyright
© 2003 Cambridge University Press

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Footnotes

Thanks to Professors Hans Opschoor, Charles Perrings, Germano Mwabu, Peter Kimuyu, participants of the Environment and Development 2nd International Conference and three anonymous referees. The usual disclaimer applies. Funding from the Environmental Economics Network for Eastern and Southern Africa (EENESA) and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) is acknowledged.
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