Skip to main content Accesibility Help
×
×
Home

Defining Purpose and Process in Teaching History with Case Studies

  • Jack Dougherty (a1)
Extract

When the History of Education Quarterly editors invited us to contribute to this forum, they asked us to reflect on how we taught histoiy with case studies. To jump-start our exchange, they suggested four possible purposes for teaching history in this way, which I have paraphrased below:

To reflect on the antecedents of the so-called “new” educational policy topics (what is the long histoiy of standardized testing?).

To disrupt conventional beliefs with counterexamples (why did nineteenth-century science and math classrooms include so many female students?).

To compare and contrast educational change in particular places or regions (how did the development of schooling differ in New England, the New South, or New Mexico?).

To call attention to the intersection of human agency and institutional structures (how did teachers, parents, and political leaders conflict or collaborate in struggles over school reform?).

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Defining Purpose and Process in Teaching History with Case Studies
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Defining Purpose and Process in Teaching History with Case Studies
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Defining Purpose and Process in Teaching History with Case Studies
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All

1 Beadie, Nancy to Dougherty, Jack, e-mail, May 20, 2015 (in Jack Dougherty's possession).

2 The HBS Case Method,” Harvard Business School, http://www.hbs.edu/mba/academic-experience/Pages/the-hbs-case-method.aspx; and “Case Method in Practice,” C. Roland Christensen Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard Business School, http://www.hbs.edu/teaching/case-method-in-practice/.

3 Sam Wineburg, , Martin, Daisy, and Monte-Sano, Chauncey, Reading Like a Historian: Teaching Literacy in Middle and High School History Classrooms (New York: Teachers College Press, 2011), vi. To cultivate these skills, several history educators have drawn on the “Making Sense of Evidence” section of History Matters: The U.S. Survey Course on the Web, American Social History Project/Center for Media and Learning and the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, http://historymatters.gmu.edu/browse/makesense/.

4 See the “Common Schools” section of the Education Reform syllabus (http://commons.trincoll.edu/edreform) that includes the slide presentation, “Thinking Like a Historian about the Common School Movement” (http://bit.ly/Thinking-Like-An-Historian-CSM), with links to annotated Google Docs of primary sources, such as Horace Mann, “Intellectual Education as a Means of Removing Poverty, and Securing Abundance” excerpt from “Annual Report to the Board of Education of Massachusetts for 1848,” in Life and Works of Horace Mann, ed. Mary Tyler Peabody Mann, vol. 3 (Boston: Walker, Fuller, 1865), 663–70, http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001067112; Catherine Beecher, The Evils Suffered by American Women and American Children: The Causes and the Remedy (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1846), excerpt, http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/003456542; Hughes, John, Committee of Catholics, Address of the Roman Catholics to Their Fellow Citizens, of the City and State of New York (New-York: Hugh Cassidy, 1840), http://archive.org/details/addressofromanca00newy. See also William Holmes McGuffey and Stanley W. Lindberg, “The Little Chimney Sweep (First Reader, 1836–1857 Editions),” in The Annotated McGuffey: Selections from the McGuffey Eclectic Readers, 1836–1920 (New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1976), 16–18.

5 For the original teaching essay, see Dougherty, Jack, “Making Sense of Multiple Interpretations,” History of Education Quarterly 44, no. 1 (2004): 105–8.

6 See the Curry-Cecelski exercise in the Education Reform syllabus cited above, with a link to the reading guide at http://commons.trincoll.edu/edreform/resources/curry-cecelski-reading-guide.

7 Dougherty, Jack, “Investigating Spatial Inequality with the Cities, Suburbs, and Schools Project,” in On the Line (Hartford, CT: Trinity College, 2015), http://epress.trincoll.edu/ontheline2015/chapter/investigating-spatial-inequality/.

8 See published student essays at “Trinity College Students Call Attention to Histories of Inequality,” ConnecticutHistory.org, http://connecticuthistory.org/trinity-college-students-call-attention-to-histories-of-inequality/.

9 For further details on the pedagogical process, see Rollins, Elaina, Ceglio, Clarissa, and Dougherty, Jack, “Writing Greater Hartford's Civil Rights Past with ConnecticutHistory.org,” Connecticut History Review 53, no. 2 (Fall 2014), 220–26, reprinted with permission in Dougherty and contributors, On the Line, http://epress.trincoll.edu/ontheline2015/chapter/connecticut-history-review/. For a video on the process and student reflections at ConnecticutHistory.org programs, see Make Life Collaborative, 2013, http://youtu.be/NuWg9Jrkrpw.

10 Students engaged in this brief role-play after reading most of Pillars of the Republic paying particular attention to chapter 7 on resistance to reform. Carl Kaestle, Pillars of the Republic: Common Schools and American Society, 1780–1860 (New York: Hill and Wang, 1983).

11 At this writing, the “Big List of Reacting Games” included over ten published games, over seventy-five working models and prototypes, and seventy more at the conceptual stage. Reacting to the Past, Barnard College, accessed August 2015, https://reacting.barnard.edu/.

12 Lang, James M., “Being Nehru for 2 Days,” The Chronicle of Higher Education, 21 July 2014, http://chronicle.com/article/Being-Nehru-for-2-Days/147813/.

13 Carnes, Mark C., Minds on Fire: How Role-Immersion Games Transform College (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014).

He teaches two courses: Education Reform—Past and Present (a mid-level survey course that typically enrolls twenty undergraduates) and Cities, Suburbs, and Schools (an upper-level research seminar that enrolls ten to fifteen undergraduates). For syllabus and course materials for the former, see ; for the latter's, see .

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

History of Education Quarterly
  • ISSN: 0018-2680
  • EISSN: 1748-5959
  • URL: /core/journals/history-of-education-quarterly
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed