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Feminist Theory in Science: Working Toward a Practical Transformation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2020

Abstract

Although a rich tradition of feminist critiques of science exists, it is often difficult for feminists who are scientists to bridge these critiques with practical transformations in scientific knowledge production. In this paper, I go beyond the general bases of feminist critiques of science by using feminist theory in science to illustrate how a practical transformation in methodology can change molecular biology based research in the reproductive sciences.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Hypatia, Inc.

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