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Recognizing the Passion in Deliberation: Toward a More Democratic Theory of Deliberative Democracy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 March 2020

Abstract

Critics have suggested that deliberative democracy reproduces inequalities of gender, race, and class by privileging calm rational discussion over passionate speech and action. Their solution is to supplement deliberation with such forms of emotional expression. Hall argues that deliberation already inherently involves passion, a point that is especially important to recognize in order to deconstruct the dichotomy between reason and passion that plays a central role in reinforcing inequalities of gender, race, and class in the first place.

Type
Revisioning Deliberation
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Hypatia, Inc.

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