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Possibilities of wireless power supply

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2010

Jan Kracek*
Affiliation:
Czech Technical University in Prague – Department of Electromagnetic Field, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague, Czech Republic.
Milos Mazanek
Affiliation:
Czech Technical University in Prague – Department of Electromagnetic Field, Technicka 2, 166 27 Prague, Czech Republic.
*
Corresponding author: J. Kracek Email: jan.kracek@fel.cvut.cz

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of the principles suitable for wireless power supply of devices with a small power input in picocells. This means predominantly different types of small electric devices in the space of rooms. Basic principles, namely electromagnetic induction and electromagnetic wave, are explained using examples of developed systems. Different types of wireless power systems are compared with respect to efficiency, frequency, power, and transmission distance.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and the European Microwave Association 2010

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References

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