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Design and evaluation protocol for ‘DEALTS 2’: a simulation-based dementia education intervention for acute care settings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 January 2019

Michelle Heward*
Affiliation:
Ageing and Dementia Research Centre, Bournemouth University, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK Department of Human Sciences and Public Health, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK
Michele Board
Affiliation:
Ageing and Dementia Research Centre, Bournemouth University, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK Department of Nursing and Clinical Science, Bournemouth House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK
Ashley Spriggs
Affiliation:
Ageing and Dementia Research Centre, Bournemouth University, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK Department of Nursing and Clinical Science, Bournemouth House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK
Jane Murphy
Affiliation:
Ageing and Dementia Research Centre, Bournemouth University, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK Department of Human Sciences and Public Health, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Dr Michelle Heward, Ageing and Dementia Research Centre, Bournemouth University, Royal London House, Lansdowne Campus, Bournemouth, Dorset, UK. Phone: +44 (0)1202 962536; Fax: +44 (0)1202 962736. Email: mheward@bournemouth.ac.uk.

Abstract

Background:

There is a paucity of simulation-based dementia education programmes for acute care settings that support the development of interpersonal skills pertinent to good care. Moreover, few studies measure the effectiveness of such programmes by evaluating the persistence of practice change beyond the immediate timeframe of the workshops. We were commissioned by Health Education England (HEE) to develop and evaluate ‘DEALTS 2’, a national simulation-based education toolkit informed by the Humanisation Values Framework, developed at Bournemouth University and based on an experiential learning approach to facilitate positive impacts on practice. This paper describes the process of developing DEALTS 2 and the protocol for evaluating the impact of this intervention on practice across England.

Methods:

Intervention development: Following an initial scoping exercise to explore the barriers and enablers of delivering the original DEALTS programme, we developed, piloted, and rolled out DEALTS 2 across England through a Train the Trainer (TTT) model. Key stakeholders were asked to critically feedback during the development process.

Evaluation design:

Mixed methods approach underpinned by Kirkpatrick Model for evaluating effectiveness of training; assessing reaction, learning, behaviour, and results. Evaluation forms and telephone interviews (quantitative and qualitative) with trainers that attended TTT workshops (n = 196) and, once implemented in individual Trusts, the staff that the trainers train.

Conclusions:

Evaluation of implementation and impact on care delivery for people with dementia will provide evidence of effectiveness. This will support the future development of simulation-based education programmes, amidst the current complexity of pressure in resource limited healthcare settings.

Type
Original Research Article
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2019

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