Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-vkhs7 Total loading time: 0.301 Render date: 2023-02-03T03:34:26.549Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Reliability and validity of the telephone version of the Cantonese Mini-mental State Examination (T-CMMSE) when used with elderly patients with and without dementia in Hong Kong

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2009

Shui Sang Wong*
Affiliation:
Occupational Therapy Department, United Christian Hospital, 130 Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Kenneth Nai Kuen Fong
Affiliation:
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Shui Sang Wong, G/F, Block P, Occupational Therapy Department, United Christian Hospital, 130 Hip Wo Street, Kwun Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong. Phone: +852 6300 5433; Fax: +852 3513 5541. Email: polyustudentsang@yahoo.com.hk.

Abstract

Background: The objectives of this study were to examine the reliability and validity of a 26-point telephone version of the Cantonese Mini-mental State Examination (T-CMMSE) for a sample of 65 elderly patients, comprising 31 patients without dementia and 34 patients with dementia, in an acute regional hospital in Hong Kong, and to identify an optimal cut-off score to discriminate between those patients with dementia and those without.

Methods: Participants were rated by using the face-to-face Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) before inpatient discharge and the T-CMMSE after inpatient discharge, and were rated separately by two raters in two telephone follow-up sessions using the T-CMMSE.

Results: The results of the study indicated that the scale had excellent inter-and intra-rater reliabilities. There was substantial agreement between the two versions of the examination (κ > 0.6–0.8 ≤) for orientation, registration, and recall items. An optimal cut-off score of ≤ 16 was suggested for the T-CMMSE to discriminate between those with and without dementia.

Conclusion: The T-CMMSE can be used in telephone follow-ups as an alternative to the conventional face-to-face version.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anthony, J. C., Le Resche, L. and Niaz, V (1982). Limits of the “Mini-Mental State” as a screening test for dementia and delirium among hospital patient. Psychological Medicine, 12, 397408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blum, L. (n.d.). Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Available at: http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/strokengine-assess/module_mmse_intro-en.html; last accessed 12 August 2007.Google Scholar
Brandt, J., Spencer, M. and Folstein, M. (1988). The telephone interview for cognitive status. Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology, and Behavioral Neurology, 2, 111117.Google Scholar
Census and Statistics Department (2006a). Hong Kong Population Projections 2007–2036. Hong Kong: Census and Statistics Department.Google Scholar
Census and Statistics Department (2006b). Population by Age Group, 1996, 2001 and 2006. Available at: http://www.bycensus2006.gov.hk/data/data3/statistical_tables/index.htm; last accessed 5 August 2007.Google Scholar
Chiu, H. F. K., Lee, H. C., Chung, W. S. and Kwong, P. K. (1994). Reliability and validity of the Cantonese version of Mini-mental State Examination: m preliminary study. Journal of the Hong Kong College of Psychiatrists, 4, 2528.Google Scholar
Escobar, J. I., Burnam, A., Karno, M., Forsythe, A., Landsverk, J. and Golding, J. M. (1986). Use of the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) in a community population of mixed ethnicity. Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, 174, 607614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fan, T. W. (1992). Brief cognitive mental status tests for psychogeriatric outpatients: a pilot study. Journal of the Hong Kong College of Psychiatrists, 2, 6978.Google Scholar
Folstein, M. F., Folstein, S. E. and McHugh, P. R. (1975). Mini-mental state: a practical method for grading the cognitive state of patients for the clinician. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 12, 189198.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Folstein, M., Anthony, J. C., Parhad, I., Duffy, B. and Greenberg, E. M. (1985). The meaning of cognitive impairment in the elderly. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 33, 228235.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ginkgo Group. (n.d.). What is Dementia? Occurrence. Available at: http://www.ginkgogroup.org/html/text_only/english/learnDementia_4_eng_t.htm; last accessed 5 August 2007.Google Scholar
Holzer, C. E., Tischler, G. L., Leaf, P. J. and Myers, J. K. (1983). An epidemiologic assessment of cognitive impairment in a community population. Research in Community Mental Health, 4, 332.Google Scholar
Katzman, R. et al. (1988). A Chinese version of the mini-mental state examination: impact of illiteracy in a Shanghai dementia survey. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 10, 971978.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Korner-Bitensky, N. and Wood-Dauphinee, S. (1995). Barthel Index information elicited over the telephone: is it reliable? American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 74, 918.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, G., Shen, Y. C., Chen, C. H., Zhao, Y. W., Li, S. R. and Lu, M. (1989). An epidemiological survey of age-related dementia in an urban area of Beijing. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 79, 557563.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magaziner, J., Bassett, S. S. and Hebel, J. R. (1987). Predicting performance on the Mini-mental State Examination: use of age- and education-specific equations. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 35, 9961000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Newkirk, L. A., Kim, J. M., Thompson, J. M., Tinklenberg, J. R., Yesavage, J. A. and Taylor, J. L. (2004). Validation of a 26-point telephone version of the Mini-mental State Examination. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 17, 8187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Portney, L. G. and Watkins, M. P. (2000). Foundations of Clinical Research: Applications to Practice. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc.Google Scholar
Roccaforte, W. H., Burke, W. J., Bayer, B. L. and Wengel, S. P. (1992). Validation of a telephone version of the Mini-mental State Examination. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 40, 697702.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sahadevan, S., Lim, P. P. J., Tan, N. J. L. and Chan, S. P. (2000). Diagnostic performance of two mental status tests in the older Chinese: influence of education and age on cut-off values. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15, 234241.3.0.CO;2-G>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Salmon, D. P., Riekkiner, P. J., Katzuran, R., Zhang, M. Y., Jin, H. and Yu, E. (1989). Cross-culture studies of dementia. Archives of Neurology, 46, 769772.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sekaran, U. (1992). Research Methods for Business: A Skill Building Approach, 2nd edn. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Yu, E. S. H. et al. (1989). Cognitive impairment among elderly adults in Shanghai, China. Journal of Gerontology, 44, 97106.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Reliability and validity of the telephone version of the Cantonese Mini-mental State Examination (T-CMMSE) when used with elderly patients with and without dementia in Hong Kong
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Reliability and validity of the telephone version of the Cantonese Mini-mental State Examination (T-CMMSE) when used with elderly patients with and without dementia in Hong Kong
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Reliability and validity of the telephone version of the Cantonese Mini-mental State Examination (T-CMMSE) when used with elderly patients with and without dementia in Hong Kong
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *