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Supported depression self-care may prevent major depression in community-dwelling older adults with chronic physical conditions and co-morbid depressive symptoms

  • Martin G. Cole (a1) (a2), Jane McCusker (a2) (a3), Mark Yaffe (a4), Erin Strumpf (a3) (a5), Maida Sewitch (a6), Tamara Sussman (a7), Antonio Ciampi (a2) (a3) and Eric Belzile (a2)...
Extract

Self-care programs for depression use educational and cognitive-behavioral techniques (e.g. written information, audiotapes, videotapes, computerized, or group courses) to assist patients in the management of depressive symptoms (Morgan and Jorm, 2008). In the UK, these interventions are recommended as step 1 in a stepped care program for treating depression in primary care (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2007). One meta-analysis suggests that supported self-care (self-care with coaching) is more effective than unsupported self-care (Gellatly et al., 2007).

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References
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Bilsker, D. and Paterson, R. (2005). Antidepressant Skills Workbook, 2nd edn. Vancouver, BC: BC Ministry of Health. Available at: http://www.comh.ca/antidepressant-skills/adult/resources/index-asw.cfm.
Cole, M. G. (2008). Brief interventions to prevent depression in older subjects: a systematic review of feasibility and effectiveness. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 16, 435443.
Cole, M. G. and Dendukuri, N. (2003). Risk factors for depression among elderly community subjects: a systematic review and meta-analysis. American Journal of Psychiatry, 160, 11471156.
Gellatly, J., Bower, P., Hennessy, S., Richards, D., Gilbody, S. and Lovell, K. (2007). What makes self-help interventions effective in the management of depressive symptoms? Meta-analysis and meta-regression. Psychological Medicine, 37, 12171228.
McCusker, J. et al. (2014). A randomized trial of a depression self-care toolkit with or without lay telephone coaching for primary care patients with chronic physical conditions. General Hospital Psychiatry, In Press.
Morgan, A. J. and Jorm, A. F. (2008). Self-help interventions for depressive disorders and depressive symptoms: a systematic review. Annals of General Psychiatry, 7, 320.
National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (2007). Quick Reference Guide (Amended) – Depression: Management of Depression in Primary and Secondary Care. London, UK.
Reynolds, C. F. 3rd et al. (2014). Early intervention to preempt major depression among older black and white adults. Psychiatric Services, 65, 765773.
Smit, F., Ederveen, A., Cuijpers, P., Deeg, D. and Beekman, A. (2006). Opportunities for cost-effective prevention of late-life depression: an epidemiological approach. Archives of General Psychiatry, 63, 290296.
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International Psychogeriatrics
  • ISSN: 1041-6102
  • EISSN: 1741-203X
  • URL: /core/journals/international-psychogeriatrics
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