Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa
  • Get access
    Check if you have access via personal or institutional login
  • Cited by 2
  • Cited by
    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    JARVIS, LAUREN V. 2015. A CHIEF IS A CHIEF BY THE WOMEN? THE NAZARETHA CHURCH, GENDER, AND TRADITIONAL AUTHORITY IN MTUNZINI, SOUTH AFRICA, 1900–48. The Journal of African History, Vol. 56, Issue. 01, p. 57.


    Earle, Jonathon L. 2012. Reading revolution in late colonial Buganda. Journal of Eastern African Studies, Vol. 6, Issue. 3, p. 507.


    ×

POLITICS AND PREACHING: CHIEFLY CONVERTS TO THE NAZARETHA CHURCH, OBEDIENT SUBJECTS, AND SERMON PERFORMANCE IN SOUTH AFRICA*

  • JOEL CABRITA (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0021853709990818
  • Published online: 01 May 2010
Abstract
ABSTRACT

Twentieth-century Natal and Zululand chiefs' conversions to the Nazaretha Church allowed them to craft new narratives of political legitimacy and perform them to their subjects. The well-established praising tradition of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Zulu political culture had been an important narrative practice for legitimating chiefs; throughout the twentieth century, the erosion of chiefly power corresponded with a decline in chiefly praise poems. During this same period, however, new narrative occasions for chiefs seeking to legitimate their power arose in Nazaretha sermon performance. Chiefs used their conversion testimonies to narrate themselves as divinely appointed to their subjects. An alliance between the Nazaretha Church and KwaZulu chiefs of the last hundred years meant that the Church could position itself as an institution of national stature, and chiefs told stories that exhorted unruly subjects to obedience as a spiritual virtue.

Copyright
Linked references
Hide All

This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

N. Cope , ‘The Zulu petit bourgeoisie and Zulu nationalism in the 1920s: origins of Inkatha’, Journal of Southern African Studies, 16:3 (1990), 431–51

S. Marks , ‘Natal, the Zulu royal family and the ideology of segregation’, Journal of Southern African Studies, 4:2 (1978), 172–94

H. Hughes , ‘Doubly elite: exploring the life of John Langalibalele Dube’, Journal of Southern African Studies, 27:3 (2001), 445–58

K. Kresse , ‘Izibongo – the political art of praising: poetical socio-regulative discourse in Zulu society’, Journal of African Cultural Studies, 11:2 (1998), 171–96

D. Peterson , ‘Casting characters: autobiography and political imagination in central Kenya’, Research in African Literatures, 37:3 (2006), 176–92

J. Lambert , ‘Chiefship in early colonial Natal’, Journal of Southern African Studies, 21:2 (1995) 269–85

E. Gunner , ‘Power house, prison house: an oral genre and its use in Isaiah Shembe's Nazareth Baptist Church’, Journal of Southern African Studies, 14:2 (1986), 204–27

J. Fernandez , ‘In the precincts of the prophet: a day with Johannes Galilee Shembe’, Journal of Religion in Africa, 5:1 (1973), 40

R. Southall and Z. De Sas Kropiwnicki , ‘Containing chiefs: the ANC and traditional leaders in the eastern Cape, South Africa’, Canadian Journal of African Studies, 37:1 (2003), 4882

Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

The Journal of African History
  • ISSN: 0021-8537
  • EISSN: 1469-5138
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-african-history
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords: