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Gamification in the Latin Classroom

  • Moss Pike
Extract

‘Gamification’ and games have become a popular trend in education, and have thus been given much attention in sessions at education conferences all over the world. But their rather rapid spread has also led to some misunderstandings about what they are and how they can be used in a classroom, largely owing to the wide variety of gamified courses and GBL-based classroom activities that have been popularised by educational media. Rather than serve as a panacea to fix classroom problems, however, gamification and GBL should be considered as just one of many tools, albeit quite powerful ones grounded in cognitive psychology, which can be used to create engaging and dynamic learning environments. After a short introduction to the ideas behind gamification and GBL and the brain science that makes them so powerful, an example of a gamified middle-school level Latin course will be described in detail.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
References
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Kelley, T. and Kelley, D. (2013). Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All. New York: Crown Business.
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Nussbaum, B. (2013). Creative Intelligence: Harnessing the Power to Create, Connect, and Inspire. New York: Harper Business.
Pike, M. (2014a). ‘Grading Participation?’. http://cinisetfavilla.blogspot.com/2014/09/grading-participation.html
Pike, M. (2014b). ‘DT in the Latin Classroom’. http://cinisetfavilla.blogspot.com/2014/10/dt-in-latin-classroom.html
Pike, M. (2015). ‘Roman Architecture in Minecraft’. http://cinisetfavilla.blogspot.com/2015/01/roman-architecture-in-minecraft.html
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Journal of Classics Teaching
  • ISSN: -
  • EISSN: 2058-6310
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-classics-teaching
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