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Sex Trafficking, Russian Infiltration, Birth Certificates, and Pedophilia: A Survey Experiment Correcting Fake News

  • Ethan Porter (a1), Thomas J. Wood (a2) and David Kirby (a3)
Extract

Following the 2016 U.S. election, researchers and policymakers have become intensely concerned about the dissemination of “fake news,” or false news stories in circulation (Lazer et al., 2017). Research indicates that fake news is shared widely and has a pro-Republican tilt (Allcott and Gentzkow, 2017). Facebook now flags dubious stories as disputed and tries to block fake news publishers (Mosseri, 2016). While the typical misstatements of politicians can be corrected (Nyhan et al., 2017), the sheer depth of fake news’s conspiracizing may preclude correction. Can fake news be corrected?

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References
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Allcott, H., and Gentzkow, M.. 2017. “Social Media and Fake News in the 2016 Election.” Journal of Economic Perspectives 31 (2): 211236.
Lazar, D., Matthew, B., Nir, G., Lisa, F., Kenneth, J., Will, H., and Mattsson, C.. 2017. “Combating Fake News: An Agenda for Research and Action.” The Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy. (https://shorensteincenter.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/Combating-Fake-News-Agenda-for-Research-1.pdf), accessed September 16, 2017.
Mosseri, A. 2016. “News Feed FYI: Addressing Hoaxes and Fake News.” Facebook.com (December 26). (https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2016/12/news-feed-fyi-addressing-hoaxes-and-fake-news/)
Nyhan, B., Ethan, P., Jason, R., and Wood, T.. 2017. “Taking Corrections Literally But Not Seriously? The Effects of Information on Factual Beliefs and Candidate Favorability.” (https://ssrn.com/abstract=2995128), accessed June 29, 2017.
Pennycook, G., and Rand, D. G.. 2017. “Assessing the Effect of ‘Disputed’ Warnings and Source Salience on Perceptions of Fake News Accuracy.” (https://ssrn.com/abstract=abstract_id=3035384), accessed September 12, 2017.
Wood, T. J., and Ethan, P.. 2016. “The Elusive Backfire Effect: Mass Attitudes Steadfast Factual Adherence.” (https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/abstract_id=2819073), accessed August 6, 2016.
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Journal of Experimental Political Science
  • ISSN: 2052-2630
  • EISSN: 2052-2649
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-experimental-political-science
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