Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-pgkvd Total loading time: 0.299 Render date: 2022-08-13T16:56:58.580Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Application of a magnetic mass spectrometer to ionization studies in impure shock-heated argon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2006

B. Sturtevant
Affiliation:
Graduate Aeronautical Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

Abstract

A study of the unique role of impurities in the initial stages of ionization relaxation in shock-heated argon, using a sampling mass spectrometer to determine the ionic products of the reaction, is described. The ions are extracted from the shock tube through a small orifice in the end wall after they have diffused through the dense thermal layer adjacent to the wall from the ionizing gas behind the reflected shock wave. The ion diffusion is analysed in detail to assess the possibility that the sampling process alters the reaction products. It is shown that this is unlikely because the impurities are in dilute concentration and the reaction is studied in its initial stages. This mode of sampling is compared with others.

The experiments were conducted in argon at temperature of 16,600 °K and pressure of 16 mmHg with an estimated impurity level of 300 parts per million. A surprisingly large number of different ions were detected during the initial stages of ionization. O+ and H+ were found in much greater amounts than any of the other products, each being about five times more abundant than A+. The results suggest that H2O is probably quite generally the most important impurity in thermal-ionization experiments, and that ionization ‘incubation’ is due to dissociation of molecular impurities (especially H2O) before ionization commences. Possible explanations of the well-known efficiency of small amounts of impurities in initiating ionization are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1966 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Amdur, I. & Mason, E. A. 1958 Phys. Fluids, 1, 370.
Bier, K. & Hagena, O. 1963 Rarefied Gasdynamics, p. 478 (ed. J. Laurmann). New York: Academic Press.
Blackman, V. H. & Niblett, G. B. F. 1961 Fundamental Data Obtained from Shock-Tube Experiments, p. 221 (ed. A. Ferri). New York: Pergamon Press.
Bradley, J. N. & Kistiakowsky, G. B. 1961 J. Chem. Phys. 35, 25.
Fay, J. A. 1964 The High Temperature Aspects of Hypersonic Flow, p. 590 (ed. W. C. Nelson). New York: Pergamon Press.
Fay, J. A. & Kemp, N. H. 1965 J. Fluid Mech. 21, 65.
Fenn, J. B. & Deckers, J. 1963 Rarefied Gasdynamics, p. 497 (ed. J. Laurmann). New York: Academic Press.
Fite, W. L., Smith, A. C. H. & Stebbings, R. F. 1962 Proc. Roy. Soc. A, 268, 527.
Goldsworthy, F. A. 1958 J. Fluid Mech. 5, 196.
Harwell, K. E. & Jahn, R. G. 1964 Phys. Fluids, 7, 214.Corrigendum p. 1554.
Hasted, J. B. 1952 Proc. Roy. Soc., A 212, 235.
Hasted, J. B. 1965 Physics of Atomic Collisions, p. 421. London: Butterworths.
Hirschfelder, J. O., Curtiss, C. F. & Bird, R. B. 1954 Molecular Theory of Gases and Liquids, p. 518. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
Kelly, A. J. 1965 Private communication.
Liepmann, H. W., Roshko, A., Coles, D. & Sturtevant, B. 1962 Rev. Sci. Instr. 33, 62.
Massey, H. S. W. & Burhop, E. H. S. 1952 Electronic and Ionic Impact Phenomena, p. 625. Oxford University Press.
Nier, A. O. 1940 Rev. Sci. Instr. 11, 21.
Nier, A. O. 1947 Rev. Sci. Instr. 18, 39.
Petschek, A. & Byron, S. 1957 Ann. Phys. (N.Y.), 1, 270.
Sturtevant, B. 1961 Phys. Fluids, 4, 1064.
6
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Application of a magnetic mass spectrometer to ionization studies in impure shock-heated argon
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Application of a magnetic mass spectrometer to ionization studies in impure shock-heated argon
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Application of a magnetic mass spectrometer to ionization studies in impure shock-heated argon
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *