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Axisymmetric gravity currents in a porous medium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2005

SARAH LYLE
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK, slyle81@gmail.com, mb72@esc.cam.ac.uk
HERBERT E. HUPPERT
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK, slyle81@gmail.com, mb72@esc.cam.ac.uk Institute of Theoretical Geophysics, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CMS, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK, heh1@esc.cam.ac.uk, hallwort@esc.cam.ac.uk
MARK HALLWORTH
Affiliation:
Institute of Theoretical Geophysics, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CMS, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK, heh1@esc.cam.ac.uk, hallwort@esc.cam.ac.uk
MIKE BICKLE
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ, UK, slyle81@gmail.com, mb72@esc.cam.ac.uk
ANDY CHADWICK
Affiliation:
British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Nottingham NG12 5GG, rach@bgs.ac.uk

Abstract

The release from a point source of relatively heavy fluid into a saturated porous medium above an impermeable boundary is considered. A theoretical relationship is compared with experimental data for the rate of propagation of the front of the resulting gravity current and its shape. A motivation of the study, the problem of carbon dioxide sequestration, is briefly discussed.

Type
Papers
Copyright
© 2005 Cambridge University Press

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