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Buoyancy-driven motion of a deformable drop toward a planar wall at low Reynolds number

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2006

E. P. Ascoli
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Present address: Rockwell International, Rocketdyne Division M/S WC75, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, CA 91303, USA.
D. S. Dandy
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Present address: Div. 8363, Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550, USA.
L. G. Leal
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA Present address: Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA.

Abstract

The slow viscous motion of a deformable drop moving normal to a planar wall is studied numerically. In particular, a boundary integral technique employing the Green's function appropriate to a no-slip planar wall is used. Beginning with spherical drop shapes far from the wall, highly deformed and ‘dimpled’ drop configurations are obtained as the planar wall is approached. The initial stages of dimpling and their evolution provide information and insight into the basic assumptions of film-drainage theory.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1990 Cambridge University Press

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References

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