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Cavity ripple dynamics after pinch-off

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2018

Jean-François Louf
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
Brian Chang
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
Javad Eshraghi
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Austin Mituniewicz
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA
Pavlos P. Vlachos*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Sunghwan Jung*
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
*
Email addresses for correspondence: pvlachos@purdue.edu, sunnyjsh@vt.edu
Email addresses for correspondence: pvlachos@purdue.edu, sunnyjsh@vt.edu

Abstract

During water entry, a projectile can entrain an air cavity that trails behind it. Most previous studies focus on the formation and pinch-off dynamics of the air cavity, but only a few have investigated the long-term cavity dynamics after pinch-off. In this study, we examine the ripple formation following the pinch-off of an air cavity generated by a cone, with different cone angles and impact velocities. The amplitude and wavelength of these ripples are measured, and the force on the cone is experimentally determined. It was observed that the ripple amplitude and wavelength increase linearly with the cone impact velocity, which is predicted by our acoustic model of the compressible air cavity. In addition, the measured force exhibits distinct amplitudes and wavelengths. By measuring the length of the cavity, the resulting pressure variation was averaged inside the air cavity leading to a theoretical force amplitude, which matched our observations. We noted that the force wavelength also follows the same acoustic model, which agrees very well with the wavelength of the ripples.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© 2018 Cambridge University Press 

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