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Flight-crash events in superfluid turbulence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 August 2019

P. Švančara
Affiliation:
Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague, Czech Republic
M. La Mantia*
Affiliation:
Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 3, 121 16 Prague, Czech Republic
*
Email address for correspondence: lamantia@mbox.troja.mff.cuni.cz

Abstract

We show experimentally that the mechanisms of energy transport in turbulent flows of superfluid $^{4}\text{He}$ are strikingly different from those occurring in turbulent flows of viscous fluids. We argue that the result can be related to the role played by quantized vortices in this unique type of turbulence. The flow-induced motions of relatively small particles suspended in the liquid reveal that, for scales of the order of the mean distance between the vortices, the particles do not tend on average to decelerate faster than they accelerate, whereas, at larger scales, a classical-like asymmetry is recovered. It follows that, in the range of investigated parameters, flight-crash events are less apparent than in classical turbulence. We specifically link the outcome to the time symmetry of quantized vortex reconnections observed at scales comparable to the typical particle size.

Type
JFM Rapids
Copyright
© 2019 Cambridge University Press 

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