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Friction properties of superhydrophobic ridges

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 March 2020

Hélène de Maleprade
Affiliation:
Physique and Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes, UMR 7636 du CNRS, ESPCI, PSL research University, 75005Paris, France LadHyX, UMR 7646 du CNRS, École polytechnique, 91128Palaiseau, France
Armelle Keiser
Affiliation:
Physique and Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes, UMR 7636 du CNRS, ESPCI, PSL research University, 75005Paris, France LadHyX, UMR 7646 du CNRS, École polytechnique, 91128Palaiseau, France
Christophe Clanet
Affiliation:
Physique and Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes, UMR 7636 du CNRS, ESPCI, PSL research University, 75005Paris, France LadHyX, UMR 7646 du CNRS, École polytechnique, 91128Palaiseau, France
David Quéré*
Affiliation:
Physique and Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes, UMR 7636 du CNRS, ESPCI, PSL research University, 75005Paris, France LadHyX, UMR 7646 du CNRS, École polytechnique, 91128Palaiseau, France
*
Email address for correspondence: david.quere@espci.fr

Abstract

The extreme mobility of droplets on non-wetting materials implies the necessity of controlling their motion, direction or speed. In this paper, we show how ridges allow us to tune drop friction. Depending on the liquid speed and viscosity, two regimes emerge: fast drops with low viscosity dynamically deform and undergo inertial friction, so that their velocity is eventually fixed by the deformations induced by the ridges; in contrast, viscous drops hardly interact with the texture, so that their velocity is classically limited by viscous dissipation, as on a flat substrate. The transition between these two regimes reveals spectacular morphological changes: drops with intermediate viscosity elongate and adopt worm-like shapes, which we qualitatively describe.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 1

Water droplet with volume 100µL deposited on a superhydrophobic track tilted by 10.4°, with texture of wavelength 3 mm and depth 1 mm. The movie is slowed down 100x, and the camera is tilted by the same angle as the track. The vertical orange lines highlight the length over which bulges hit merlons.

Download de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 1(Video)
Video 569 KB

de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 2

100µL-droplet of viscosity 500 mPa.s, on a superhydrophobic track tilted by 11.5°, with texture of wavelength 3 mm and depth 1 mm. The movie is slowed down 4x, and the camera is tilted by the same angle as the track.

Download de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 2(Video)
Video 2 MB

de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 3

100µL-droplet of viscosity 2 mPa.s, on a superhydrophobic track tilted by 12.4°, with texture of wavelength 3 mm and depth 1 mm. The movie is slowed down 60x, and the camera is tilted by the same angle as the track.

Download de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 3(Video)
Video 3 MB

de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 4

100µL-droplet of viscosity 3 mPa.s, on a superhydrophobic track tilted by 12.4°, with texture of wavelength 3 mm and depth 1 mm. The movie is slowed down 60x, and the camera is tilted by the same angle as the track.

Download de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 4(Video)
Video 2 MB

de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 5

100µL-droplet of viscosity 5 mPa.s, on a superhydrophobic track tilted by 12.4°, with texture of wavelength 3 mm and depth 1 mm. The movie is slowed down 60x, and the camera is tilted by the same angle as the track.

Download de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 5(Video)
Video 3 MB

de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 6

100µL-droplet of viscosity 20 mPa.s, on a superhydrophobic track tilted by 12.4°, with texture of wavelength 3 mm and depth 1 mm. The movie is slowed down 60x, and the camera is tilted by the same angle as the track.

Download de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 6(Video)
Video 5 MB

de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 7

100µL-droplet of viscosity 40 mPa.s, on a superhydrophobic track tilted by 12.4°, with texture of wavelength 3 mm and depth 1 mm. The movie is slowed down 60x, and the camera is tilted by the same angle as the track.

Download de Maleprade et al. supplementary movie 7(Video)
Video 7 MB
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