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Ideal jet flow in two dimensions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2006

Frédéric Dias
Affiliation:
Department of Ocean Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA
Alan R. Elcrat
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 67208, USA
Lloyd N. Trefethen
Affiliation:
Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA

Abstract

A jet is a stream of one fluid entering another at high speed. In the simplest classical model of jet flow, the geometry is two-dimensional, gravity and viscosity are ignored, the moving fluid is a liquid, and the stationary fluid is a gas whose influence is assumed negligible. The description of this idealized flow can be reduced to a problem of complex analysis, but, except for very simple nozzle geometries, that problem cannot be solved analytically. This paper presents an efficient procedure for solving the jet problem numerically in the case of an arbitrary polygonal nozzle.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1987 Cambridge University Press

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References

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