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Impact of a shock wave on a heterogeneous foam film

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 December 2020

Quentin Raimbaud
Affiliation:
Université de Rennes, CNRS, IPR (Institut de Physique de Rennes) – UMR 6251, F-35000 Rennes, France
Martin Monloubou
Affiliation:
ENSTA Bretagne, UMR CNRS 6027, Institut de Recherche Dupuy de Lôme – IRDL, F-29806 Brest, France
Steven Kerampran
Affiliation:
ENSTA Bretagne, UMR CNRS 6027, Institut de Recherche Dupuy de Lôme – IRDL, F-29806 Brest, France
Isabelle Cantat
Affiliation:
Université de Rennes, CNRS, IPR (Institut de Physique de Rennes) – UMR 6251, F-35000 Rennes, France
Corresponding

Abstract

Liquid foams are, amongst other applications, used to mitigate shock waves. This aspect has received considerable attention at the macroscopic scale. However, the interaction between foam films and shock waves is still poorly understood and may be an important missing local information to build mitigation models. In this paper, we experimentally identify a new process leading to the foam film rupture, which dominates when the film thickness is sufficiently heterogeneous. Using a two-thickness film with a sharp and localised thickness gradient, we record the deformation of the interface between the thick and the thin parts. We observe the growth of an excess liquid area in the thin part and establish an analytical model and scaling laws which account for this phenomenon. Our results in this ideal configuration are consistent with actual rupture processes at stake in heterogeneous foam films.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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