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Large-eddy simulation of passive scalar dispersion in an urban-like canopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2013

D. A. Philips
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 488 Escondido Mall, Building 02-500, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
R. Rossi
Affiliation:
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Universitá di Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna, Italy
G. Iaccarino
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 488 Escondido Mall, Building 02-500, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
Corresponding

Abstract

Results from large-eddy simulations of short-range dispersion of a passive scalar from a point source release in an urban-like canopy are presented. The computational domain is that of a variable height array of buildings immersed in a pressure-driven, turbulent flow with a roughness Reynolds number ${\mathit{Re}}_{\tau } = 433$ . A comparative study of several cases shows the changes in plume behaviour for different mean flow directions and source locations. The analysis of the results focuses on utilizing the high-fidelity datasets to examine the three-dimensional flow field and scalar plume structure. The detailed solution of the flow and scalar fields within the canopy allows for a direct assessment of the impact of local features of the building array geometry. The staggered, skewed and aligned arrangements of the buildings with respect to the oncoming flow were shown to affect plume development. Additional post-processing quantified this development through parameters fundamental to reduced-order Gaussian dispersion models. The parameters include measures of concentration decay with distance from the source as well as plume trajectory and spread. The horizontal plume trajectory and width were found to be more sensitive to source location variations, and hence local geometric features, than vertical plume parameters.

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Copyright
©2013 Cambridge University Press 

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