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On boundary-layer flows induced by the motion of stretching surfaces

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2012

Talal T. Al-Housseiny
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
Howard A. Stone*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
*
Email address for correspondence: hastone@princeton.edu

Abstract

We investigate laminar boundary-layer flows due to translating, stretching, incompressible sheets. Unlike the classical problem in the literature where the mechanics of the sheet are neglected, and kinematics are prescribed, the dynamics of both the fluid and the sheet are herein coupled. Two types of stretching sheets are considered: an elastic sheet that obeys linear elasticity and a sheet that deforms as a viscous Newtonian fluid. In both cases, we find self-similar solutions to the coupled fluid/sheet system. These self-similar solutions are only valid under limiting conditions.

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Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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