Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-jlg5l Total loading time: 0.668 Render date: 2022-01-28T20:39:55.205Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Pulsatile flow in stenotic geometries: flow behaviour and stability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2009

M. D. GRIFFITH*
Affiliation:
Fluids Laboratory for Aeronautical and Industrial Research (FLAIR), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia Institut de Recherche sur les Phénomènes Hors Equilibre (IRPHE), CNRS/Universités Aix-Marseille, 49 rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie, BP 146, F-13384 Marseille Cedex 13, France
T. LEWEKE
Affiliation:
Institut de Recherche sur les Phénomènes Hors Equilibre (IRPHE), CNRS/Universités Aix-Marseille, 49 rue Frédéric Joliot-Curie, BP 146, F-13384 Marseille Cedex 13, France
M. C. THOMPSON
Affiliation:
Fluids Laboratory for Aeronautical and Industrial Research (FLAIR), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
K. HOURIGAN
Affiliation:
Fluids Laboratory for Aeronautical and Industrial Research (FLAIR), Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800, Australia
*
Email address for correspondence: martin.gri.th@eng.monash.edu.au

Abstract

Pulsatile inlet flow through a circular tube with an axisymmetric blockage of varying size is studied both numerically and experimentally. The geometry consists of a long, straight tube and a blockage, semicircular in cross-section, serving as a simplified model of an arterial stenosis. The stenosis is characterized by a single parameter, the aim being to highlight fundamental behaviours of constricted pulsatile flows. The Reynolds number is varied between 50 and 700 and the stenosis degree by area between 0.20 and 0.90. Numerically, a spectral element code is used to obtain the axisymmetric base flow fields, while experimentally, results are obtained for a similar set of geometries, using water as the working fluid. For low Reynolds numbers, the flow is characterized by a vortex ring which forms directly downstream of the stenosis, for which the strength and downstream propagation velocity vary with the stenosis degree. Linear stability analysis is performed on the simulated axisymmetric base flows, revealing a range of absolute instability modes. Comparisons are drawn between the numerical linear stability analysis and the observed instability in the experimental flows. The observed flows are less stable than the numerical analysis predicts, with convective shear layer instability present in the experimental flows. Evidence is found of Kelvin–Helmholtz-type shear layer roll-ups; nonetheless, the possibility of the numerically predicted absolute instability modes acting in the experimental flow is left open.

Type
Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ahmed, S. A. 1998 An experimental investigation of pulsatile flow through a smooth constriction. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 17, 309318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ahmed, S. A. & Giddens, D. P. 1983 Flow disturbance measurements through a constricted tube at moderate Reynolds numbers. J. Biomech. 16, 955963.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ahmed, S. A. & Giddens, D. P. 1984 Pulsatile poststenotic flow studies with laser doppler anemometry. J. Biomech. 17, 695705.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berger, S. A. & Jou, L-D. 2000 Flows in stenotic vessels. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 32, 347382.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blackburn, H. M. & Sherwin, S. J. 2007 Instability modes and transition of pulsatile stenotic flow: pulse-period dependence. J. Fluid Mech. 573, 5788.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cassanova, R. A. & Giddens, D. P. 1978 Disorder distal to modified stenoses in steady and pulsatile flow. J. Biomech. 11, 441453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Deplano, V. & Siouffi, M. 1999 Experimental and numerical study of pulsatile flows through stenosis: wall shear stress analysis. J. Biomech. 32, 10811090.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gharib, M, Rambod, E. & Shariff, K. 1998 A universal time scale for vortex ring formation. J. Fluid Mech. 360, 121140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffith, M. D. 2007 The stability and behaviour of flows in stenotic geometries. PhD thesis, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.Google Scholar
Griffith, M. D., Leweke, T., Thompson, M. C. & Hourigan, K. 2008 Steady inlet flow in stenotic geometries: convective and absolute instabilities. J. Fluid Mech. 616, 111133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Griffith, M. D., Thompson, M. C., Leweke, T., Hourigan, K. & Anderson, W. P. 2007 Wake behaviour and instability of flow through a partially blocked channel. J. Fluid Mech. 582, 319340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Khalifa, A. M. A. & Giddens, D. P. 1978 Analysis of disorder in pulsatile flows with application to poststenotic blood velocity measurement in dogs. J. Biomech. 11, 129141.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Khalifa, A. M. A. & Giddens, D. P. 1981 Characterization and evolution of poststenotic disturbances. J. Biomech. 14, 279296.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ku, D. N. 1997 Blood flow in arteries. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 29, 399434.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leweke, T., Provansal, M., Ormieres, D. & Lebescond, R. 1999 Vortex dynamics in the wake of a sphere. Phys. Fluids 11, S12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lieber, B. B. & Giddens, D. P. 1990 Post-stenotic core flow behaviour in pulsatile flow and its effects in wall shear stress. J. Biomech. 23, 597605.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liu, H. & Yamaguchi, T. 2001 Waveform dependence of pulsatile flow in a stenosed channel. J. Biomech. Engng 123, 8896.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Loudon, C. & Tordesillas, A. 1998 The use of the dimensionless Womersley number to characterize the unsteady nature of internal flows. J. Theor. Biol. 191, 6378.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mallinger, F. & Drikakis, D. 2002 Instability in three-dimensional, unsteady, stenotic flows. Intl J. Heat Fluid Flow 23, 657663.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meunier, P. & Leweke, T. 2003 Analysis and treatment of errors due to high velocity gradients in particle image velocimetry. Exp. Fluids 35, 408421.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ohja, M., Cobbold, R. S. C., Johnston, K. W. & Hummel, R. L. 1989 Pulsatile flow through constricted tubes: an experimental investigation using photochromic tracer methods. J. Fluid Mech. 203, 173197.Google Scholar
Sheard, G. S., Thompson, M. C. & Hourigan, K. 2003 From spheres to circular cylinders: the stability and flow structures of bluff ring wakes. J. Fluid Mech. 492, 147180.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sherwin, S. J. & Blackburn, H. M. 2005 Three-dimensional instabilities of steady and pulsatile axisymmetric stenotic flows. J. Fluid Mech. 533, 297327.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stroud, J. S., Berger, S. A. & Saloner, D. 2000 Influence of stenosis morphology in flow through severely stenotic vessels: implications for plaque rupture. J. Biomech. 33, 443455.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thompson, M. C., Hourigan, K. & Sheridan, J. 1996 Three-dimensional instabilities in the wake of a circular cylinder. Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 12, 190196.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thompson, M. C., Leweke, T. & Provansal, M. 2001 Kinematics and dynamics of sphere wake transition. J. Fluids Struct. 15, 575585.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tu, C., Deville, M., Dheur, L. & Vanderschuren, L. 1992 Finite element simulation of pulsatile flow through arterial stenosis. J. Biomech. 25, 11411152.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Varghese, S. S. & Frankel, S. H. 2003 Numerical modelling of pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels. J. Biomech. Engng 125, 445460.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Varghese, S. S., Frankel, S. H. & Fischer, P. F. 2007 Direct numerical simulation of stenotic flows. Part 2. Pulsatile flow. J. Fluid Mech. 582, 281318.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Widnall, S. E., Bliss, D. B. & Tsai, C.-Y 1974 The instability of short waves on a vortex ring. J. Fluid Mech. 66, 3547.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Womersley, J. R. 1955 Method for the calculation of velocity, rate of flow and viscous drag in arteries when their pressure gradient is known. J. Physiol. 127, 553563.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wootton, D. M. & Ku, D. N. 1999 Fluid mechanics of vascular systems, diseases, and thrombosis. Annu. Rev. Biomed. Engng 1, 299329.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
19
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Pulsatile flow in stenotic geometries: flow behaviour and stability
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Pulsatile flow in stenotic geometries: flow behaviour and stability
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Pulsatile flow in stenotic geometries: flow behaviour and stability
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *