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Radiative interactions in boundary layers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 April 2006

S. P. Venkateshan
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012
K. Krishna Prasad
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012

Abstract

A detailed description of radiative interactions in laminar compressible boundary layers for moderate Mach numbers is presented by way of asymptotic analysis and supporting solutions. The radiation field is described by the differential approximation. While the asymptotic analysis is valid for large N (the ratio of photon mean free path to molecular mean free path) and arbitrary Boltzmann number, Bo (the ratio of convective heat flux to radiation heat flux), the solutions are obtained for Bo [Lt ] 1, the case of strong radiative interactions.

The asymptotic analysis shows the existence of an optically thin boundary layer for large N and all Bo. For Bo [Lt ] 1, two outer regions are observed — one optically thin (at short distances from the leading edge) and the other optically thick (at large distances from the leading edge). An interesting feature not pointed out in the previous literature is the existence of a wall layer at large distances from the leading edge where convective heat flux can be ignored to the leading order of approximation. The radiation field in all cases can be very well approximated by a one-dimensional description.

The solutions have been constructed using the ideas of matched asymptotic expansions by approximate analytical procedures and numerical methods. It is shown that, to the leading order of approximation, the radiation slip method yields exactly the same result as the more complicated matching procedure. Both the cases of linear and nonlinear radiation have been considered, the former being of interest in developing approximate methods which are subsequently generalized to handle the nonlinear problem. Detailed results are presented for both cases.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1979 Cambridge University Press

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