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Turbulent pipe flow downstream of a $90{{}^\circ} $ bend

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 October 2013

Leo H. O. Hellström*
Affiliation:
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
Metodi B. Zlatinov
Affiliation:
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA
Guangjun Cao
Affiliation:
CARDC, PO Box 211 Mianyang, Sichuan 621000, PR China
Alexander J. Smits
Affiliation:
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800, Australia
*
Email address for correspondence: lhellstr@Princeton.edu

Abstract

Time-resolved stereoscopic PIV was used to investigate the curvature-induced structures downstream of a $90{{}^\circ} $ bend at Reynolds numbers between $20\times 1{0}^{3} $ and $115\times 1{0}^{3} $. Data were taken at three downstream locations to investigate the evolution of the structures. Snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis shows that the most energetic structure is not the well-known Dean motion but a bimodal single cell structure with alternating direction of rotation, called the ‘swirl switching’ mode. The strengths of the Dean motion and the swirl-switching structures are similar, indicating that the difference in energy is related to their duration of occurrence, where the Dean motion is associated with a comparatively rapid transition between the two states in the swirl switching mode.

Type
Rapids
Copyright
©2013 Cambridge University Press 

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