Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-hd9dq Total loading time: 0.447 Render date: 2022-09-28T21:41:02.434Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

The use of a fibre anemometer in turbulent flows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2006

D. J. Tritton
Affiliation:
Department of Aeronautical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

Abstract

Quartz fibre anemometers have been used (as described in subsequent papers) to survey the velocity field of turbulent free convective air flows. This paper discusses the reasons for the choice of this instrument and provides the background information for its use in this way. Some practical points concerning fibre anemometers are mentioned. The rest of the paper is a theoretical study of the response of a fibre to a turbulent flow. An approximate representation of the force on the fibre due to the velocity field and the equation for a bending beam, representing the response to this force, form the basis of a consideration of the mean and fluctuating displacement of the fibre. Emphasis is placed on the behaviour when the spectrum of the turbulence is largely in frequencies low enough for the fibre to respond effectively instantaneously (as this corresponds to the practical situation). Incomplete correlation of the turbulence along the length of the fibre is taken into account. Brief mention is made to the theory of the higher-frequency (resonant) response in the context of an experimental check on the applicability of the low-frequency theory.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 1963 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Batchelor, G. K. & Proudman, I. 1956 Phil. Trans. A, 248, 369.
Collis, D. C. 1956 J. Aero. Sci. 23, 697.
Comte-Bellot, G. 1961 C. R. Acad. Sci., Paris, 253, 2846.
Cooper, D. Le B. & Linton, E. P. 1934 Proc. Nova Scotian Inst. Sci. 19. 119.
Finn, R. K. 1953 J. Appl. Phys. 24, 771.
Grant, H. L. 1958 J. Fluid Mech. 4, 149.
Hinze, J. O. 1959 Turbulence. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Kraus, W. 1940 Phys. Z. 41, 126.
Kraus, W. 1955 Messungen des Temperatur- und Geschwindigkeitsfeldes bei freier Konvektion. Karlsruhe: Braun.
Liepmann, H. W. 1955 J. Aero. Sci. 22, 197.
Mickelsen, W. R. 1955 Nat. Adv. Comm. Aero., Wash., Tech. Note no. 3570.
Payne, R. B. 1958 J. Fluid Mech. 4, 81.
Powell, A. 1958 Chap. 8, Part I of Random Vibration (ed. S. H. Crandall. Massachusetts Technology Press.
Schmidt, E. 1934 Proc. 4th Intern. Congr. Appl. Mech. (Camb.), p. 92.
Schmidt, E. & Beckman, W. 1930 Tech. Mech. Thermodynam, 1, 341, 391.
Townsend, A. A. 1956 The Structure of Turbulent Shear Flow. Cambridge University Press.
Townsend, A. A. 1959 J. Fluid Mech. 5, 209.
Tritton, D. J. 1959a Phil. Mag. (8), 4, 780.
Tritton, D. J. 1959b J. Fluid Mech. 6, 547.
Tritton, D. J. 1960 Ph. D. thesis, University of Cambridge.
Tritton, D. J. 1963a J. Fluid Mech. 16, 282.
Tritton, D. J. 1963b J. Fluid Mech. (in the Press).
White, C. M. 1946 Proc. Roy. Soc. A, 186, 472.
Wills, J. A. B. 1962 J. Fluid Mech. 12, 388.
7
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The use of a fibre anemometer in turbulent flows
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The use of a fibre anemometer in turbulent flows
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The use of a fibre anemometer in turbulent flows
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *