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Water wave transmission and energy dissipation by a floating plate in the presence of overwash

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2020

Filippo Nelli
Affiliation:
Department of Infrastructure Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Luke G. Bennetts
Affiliation:
School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
David M. Skene
Affiliation:
Faculty of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
Alessandro Toffoli
Affiliation:
Department of Infrastructure Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Corresponding

Abstract

A numerical model, based on the two-phase incompressible Navier–Stokes equations, is used to study transmission of regular water waves by a thin floating plate in two dimensions. The model is shown to capture the phenomenon of waves overwashing the plate, and the generation of turbulent bores on the upper plate surface. It is validated against laboratory experimental measurements, in terms of the transmitted wave field and overwash depths, for a set of incident wave periods and steepness values. Corresponding simulations are performed for a thick plate that does not experience overwash, which are validated using experiments where an edge barrier prevents thin-plate overwash. The model accurately reproduces (i) the linear relationship between the transmitted and incident amplitudes for the thick plate, and (ii) the decrease in proportion of incident-wave transmission for the thin plate, as incident steepness increases. Model outputs are used to link the decreasing transmission to wave-energy dissipation in the overwash, particularly where bores collide, and in the surrounding water, particularly at the plate ends. It is shown that most energy dissipation occurs in the overwash for the shortest incident waves tested, and in the surrounding water for the longer incident waves. Further, evidence is given that overwash suppresses plate motions, and causes asymmetry in plate rotations.

Type
JFM Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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Nelli et al. supplementary movie 1

Overwash of thin plastic plate from experimental test with incident period Tinc=0.9s and steepness kainc=0.12.

Download Nelli et al. supplementary movie 1(Video)
Video 11 MB

Nelli et al. supplementary movie 2

Example of mesh cells stretching and squeezing to accommodate plate motions.

Download Nelli et al. supplementary movie 2(Video)
Video 8 MB

Nelli et al. supplementary movie 3

Horizontal velocity fields around thick plates, for incident period Tinc=0.9s.

Download Nelli et al. supplementary movie 3(Video)
Video 12 MB

Nelli et al. supplementary movie 4

As in Movie S3 but for thin plate.

Download Nelli et al. supplementary movie 4(Video)
Video 12 MB

Nelli et al. supplementary movie 5

Vorticity fields, for incident period Tinc=0.9s.

Download Nelli et al. supplementary movie 5(Video)
Video 12 MB

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