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Continues American Journal of Germanic Linguistics and Literatures (1989 - 2000)
Title history
  • ISSN: 1470-5427 (Print), 1475-3014 (Online)
  • Editor: Tracy Alan Hall Indiana University, USA
  • Editorial board
The Journal of Germanic Linguistics (JGL), published for the Society for Germanic Linguistics (SGL) and the Forum for the Society for Germanic Language Studies (FGLS), carries original articles, reviews, and notes on synchronic and diachronic issues pertaining to Germanic languages and dialects from the earliest phases to the present, including English (to 1500) and the extraterritorial varieties. Contributions are invited on the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis of these languages and dialects, as well as their historical development, both linguistic and textual. Especially welcome are contributions that address questions of interest to a broad range of scholars concerned with general issues in formal theory, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. The language of publication is normally English, though manuscripts in German will be considered.

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Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Leading phonetician, Klaus J. Kohler, invites you to discuss Communicative Functions and Linguistic Forms in Speech Interaction
  • 19 October 2018, Victoria Willingale
  • Dear Reader of this Blog, Cambridge University Press has published the linguistic monograph Kohler, K. J. (2017). Communicative Functions and Linguistic Forms in Speech Interaction (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 156). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. In this Blog I, the author, introduce it to you and draw your attention to its new scientific message for spoken-language research.   Let us begin with a couple of questions. Are you interested in how speech communication works in human interaction? Do you study speech forms as anchored in communicative functions? If you are a phonetician or a linguist or a psychologist in speech recognition and understanding or a sociologist in speech communication and conversation analysis or a communications engineer your answer to both Polarity Questions should be positive, and . . . → Read More: Leading phonetician, Klaus J. Kohler, invites you to discuss Communicative Functions and Linguistic Forms in Speech Interaction...
  • Figures of Speech Competition Winners
  • 16 October 2018, Katie
  • We are delighted to announce the winner of the Figures of Speech linguistics cartoon competition. Congratulations to Jonas B. Wittke (a graduate student at Rice University, USA) and Jonathan Maki (an art teacher in Minneapolis) for winning the iPad Pro, Apple Pen and £100 of CUP vouchers with their cartoon series Minimal Peers. The judges, including linguists, cartoonists and the CUP editorial team, thought the presentation of Minimal Peers was extremely professional and the cartoons funny with approachable and intelligent linguistic points. We will be publishing the full cartoon series on our Twitter and Facebook pages over the next six weeks beginning on Friday 19 October. Congratulations, too, to the three runners up who will each receive £100 of CUP books. Selina Sutton, Northumbria University Belinda Krottendorfer, . . . → Read More: Figures of Speech Competition Winners...
  • What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit?
  • 19 July 2018, Katie
  • Blog post written by Gordana Lalic-Krstin and Nadezda Silaski, authors of the article ‘From Brexit to Bregret: An account of some Brexit-induced neologisms What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit? Judging by the material we collected from news media (broadcast and online), Facebook and Twitter, blogs and internet forums, the event  has generated a myriad of neologisms in English, using Brexit as a model or as a source word. Brexit  was modelled after Grexit, a word coined to denote the possibility of Greece leaving the Eurozone, giving rise to at least two more similarly coined blends, Spexit and Itexit, referring to the prospect of the same event in Spain and Italy. However, this was just a beginning . . . → Read More: What are the linguistic consequences of Brexit?...