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Continues American Journal of Germanic Linguistics and Literatures (1989 - 2000)
Title history
  • ISSN: 1470-5427 (Print), 1475-3014 (Online)
  • Editor: Tracy Alan Hall Indiana University, USA
  • Editorial board
The Journal of Germanic Linguistics (JGL), published for the Society for Germanic Linguistics (SGL) and the Forum for the Society for Germanic Language Studies (FGLS), carries original articles, reviews, and notes on synchronic and diachronic issues pertaining to Germanic languages and dialects from the earliest phases to the present, including English (to 1500) and the extraterritorial varieties. Contributions are invited on the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis of these languages and dialects, as well as their historical development, both linguistic and textual. Especially welcome are contributions that address questions of interest to a broad range of scholars concerned with general issues in formal theory, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. The language of publication is normally English, though manuscripts in German will be considered.

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Inaugural JIPA Most Illustrative Illustration Prize
  • 04 May 2021, Jen Malat
  • The Journal of the International Phonetic Association is delighted to announce the winner of the inaugural JIPA Most Illustrative Illustration Prize, as voted Congratulations to all the authors of Kalasha (Bumburet variety)! Congratulations also to the authors of the other shortlisted Illustrations: Ambel Kejom (Babanki) Zhushan Mandarin These Illustrations represent languages spoken in Pakistan, Indonesia (West Papua), Cameroon . . . → Read More: Inaugural JIPA Most Illustrative Illustration Prize...
  • Cambridge at AAAL 2021
  • 19 March 2021, Jen Malat
  • We’re sorry that we won’t be able to meet in person at the AAAL conference this year and invite you to visit our virtual exhibit table, including a discount Plus, AAAL delegates can join our editor Rebecca Taylor at the panel session on 23 March at 11am talking all things publishing in applied linguistics!   What’s new in applied linguistics from Cambridge? Journals Cambridge is working to open up the scholarship published in our journals. If there’s an agreement in place between CUP and your university, you may be able to publish in our applied linguistics journals Open Access and free . . . → Read More: Cambridge at AAAL 2021...
  • An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!
  • 18 December 2020, Dan Iredale
  • Written by James Stratton, author of A Diachronic Analysis of the Adjective Intensifier well from Early Modern English to Present Day English in the Canadian If you want to convince someone that the book you just read is worth reading, you can intensify your speech. Intensifiers are linguistic devices which allow speakers to impress, praise, persuade, and generally influence a listener’s understanding of a message. A sentence like “the book was so interesting” is clearly more convincing than just “the book was interesting”. However, specific intensifiers can go stale over time if they are overused, which means that different intensifiers are favored at different points in time. In Present Day English, the three most frequently used intensifiers are so, really, and very, . . . → Read More: An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!...

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