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Journal of Germanic Linguistics
Continues American Journal of Germanic Linguistics and Literatures (1989 - 2000)
Title history
  • ISSN: 1470-5427 (Print), 1475-3014 (Online)
  • Editor: Tracy Alan Hall Indiana University, USA
  • Editorial board
The Journal of Germanic Linguistics (JGL), published for the Society for Germanic Linguistics (SGL) and the Forum for the Society for Germanic Language Studies (FGLS), carries original articles, reviews, and notes on synchronic and diachronic issues pertaining to Germanic languages and dialects from the earliest phases to the present, including English (to 1500) and the extraterritorial varieties. Contributions are invited on the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis of these languages and dialects, as well as their historical development, both linguistic and textual. Especially welcome are contributions that address questions of interest to a broad range of scholars concerned with general issues in formal theory, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. The language of publication is normally English, though manuscripts in German will be considered.

Featured content

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • ‘World Englishes or English as a Lingua Franca: Where does English in China stand?
  • 13 March 2018, Dr Fan (Gabriel) Fang
  • Blog post based on an article in English Today  The spread and development of the English language has triggered debates about issues related to language ideology, identity, and ELT. China is an important context where the popularity of English use and English learning has generated various debates. In this paper, I discuss the use of the English language in China from the perspective of Global Englishes (GE) and I explore the debate about whether it should be positioned from the paradigm of World Englishes (WE) or English as a lingua franca (ELF). Essentially, the WE paradigm investigates different varieties of English in order to understand the various features of the language (including phonology, morphology, and syntax) as it is used in many post-colonial . . . → Read More: ‘World Englishes or English as a Lingua Franca: Where does English in China stand?...
  • Learning Construction Grammars Computationally
  • 27 February 2018, Jen Malat
  • Blog post by Jonathan Dunn, Ph.D. Construction Grammar, or CxG, takes a usage-based approach to describing grammar. In practice, this term usage-based means two different things: First, it means that idiomatic constructions belong in the grammar. For example, the ditransitive construction “John sent Mary a letter” has item-specific cases like “John gave Mary a hand” and “John gave Mary a hard time.” These idiomatic versions of the ditransitive have distinct meanings. While other grammatical paradigms consider these different meanings to be outside the scope of grammar, CxG argues that idiomatic constructions are actually an important part of grammar. Second, CxG is usage-based because it argues that we learn grammar by observing actual idiomatic usage: language is more nurture than nature. The role of innate . . . → Read More: Learning Construction Grammars Computationally...
  • Rihanna Works Her Multivocal Pop Persona: Morpho-syntactic and Accent Variation in Rihanna’s Singing Style
  • 27 February 2018, Lisa Jansen and Michael Westphal
  • Based on an article in English Today Pop music surpasses national and linguistic boundaries. It creates a marketplace of various linguistic resources that artists use in their music performances to create their pop personas. Performers are mobile, transnational linguistic agents. They do not only physically travel worldwide and spread their multivocality, but their products are distributed and consumed internationally via a multitude of media channels. They transport mobile standard and non-standard varieties into new spaces and make them accessible to a broad audience. Rihanna is a globally successful artist with Caribbean roots who combines different musical styles (R’n’B, hip-hop, reggae, pop) and the performance codes associated with these genres (African American English, Jamaican Creole, Standard American English). Her single “Work” stirred up attention: . . . → Read More: Rihanna Works Her Multivocal Pop Persona: Morpho-syntactic and Accent Variation in Rihanna’s Singing Style...