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Continues American Journal of Germanic Linguistics and Literatures (1989 - 2000)
Title history
  • ISSN: 1470-5427 (Print), 1475-3014 (Online)
  • Editor: Tracy Alan Hall Indiana University, USA
  • Editorial board
The Journal of Germanic Linguistics (JGL), published for the Society for Germanic Linguistics (SGL) and the Forum for the Society for Germanic Language Studies (FGLS), carries original articles, reviews, and notes on synchronic and diachronic issues pertaining to Germanic languages and dialects from the earliest phases to the present, including English (to 1500) and the extraterritorial varieties. Contributions are invited on the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis of these languages and dialects, as well as their historical development, both linguistic and textual. Especially welcome are contributions that address questions of interest to a broad range of scholars concerned with general issues in formal theory, sociolinguistics, and psycholinguistics. The language of publication is normally English, though manuscripts in German will be considered.

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Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • The grammar of engagement
  • 21 June 2018, Jen Malat
  • This blog post is written by Nicholas Evans, inspired by the Language and Cognition article “The grammar of engagement I: framework and initial exemplification” ‘Philosophy must plough over the whole of language’, as Wittgenstein famously stated. But which language? Singularising the noun allows a deceptive slippage between some language whose premises we take for granted (‘The limits of my language are the limits of my world’ was another great, and corrective, line of his) and ‘language’ in some dangerously, presumptively general sense. One of the great what-if questions for linguistics, philosophy and cognitive science is how different the last two millennia of western thought would be if we had built our . . . → Read More: The grammar of engagement...
  • Linguistics Competition: Figures of Speech
  • 15 June 2018, Victoria Willingale
  • Win an iPad Pro, Apple Pen, £100 of Cambridge University Press books and the chance to have your work seen by thousands! We are inviting academics, researchers, students and enthusiasts, from around the world, to share their passion for the subject through the medium of 6 cartoons. The competition theme is the Cambridge University Press language and linguistics collection which you are encouraged to creatively and imaginatively interpret. Your cartoons can be silly or serious, intricate or simplistic. You could incorporate word play such as puns and malapropisms, or you might choose to explore the linguistic community itself. To find out more and to enter please visit the FIGURES . . . → Read More: Linguistics Competition: Figures of Speech...
  • Q & A: Registered Reports from Journal of Child Language
  • 30 March 2018, Jen Malat
  • Beginning in summer 2018, Journal of Child Language will publish a new article format: Registered Reports. We asked two of the journal’s associate editors,   What inspired the introduction of the Registered Reports? MELANIE: Registered reports are a relatively new phenomenon in our research community, although to my understanding they come from a similar approach in the medical research community that has been around for many years for clinical trials. They are one part of the research community’s broad-based response to the so-called “Replication Crisis”. In early 2016, we were approached by the Center for Open Science requesting that we consider bringing this format to Journal of Child Language, and the . . . → Read More: Q & A: Registered Reports from Journal of Child Language...