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Editorial – the transnational history of international institutions

  • Glenda Sluga (a1)
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1 Taken from Professor Chris Bayly’s opening remarks at ‘Transnational History of International Organizations: Methodology/ Epistemology’ conference, King’s College, Cambridge, April 2009.

2 At the forefront of this research is a new international network on the History of the League of Nations, coordinated by Professors Susan Pedersen (Columbia), Patricia Clavin (Oxford), Corinne A. Pernet (St. Gallen), and Davide Rodogno (Graduate Institute, Geneva). Other new international networks include the History of International Organizations Group, founded in Geneva by Professors Sandrine Kott (University of Geneva), Davide Rodogno, and Daniel Palmieri (International Committee of the Red Cross); and Women, Internationalisms, and Gender, set up by Kathryn Sklar, Megan Threlkeld, and me (see http://wigblog.binghamton.edu/ (consulted 8 April 2011).

3 The important UNESCO figure in these collaborations was Dr Jens Boel, UNESCO’s chief archivist.

4 The original committee members were Robert Frank (France), Ilya Gaiduk (Russia), Mohieddine Hadhri (Tunisia), Akira Iriye (Japan), José Paradiso (Argentina), Emma Rothschild (United Kingdom), Jean-François Sirinelli (France), Glenda Sluga (Australia), Romila Thapar (India), Ibrahima Thioub (Senegal), and Thomas Weiss (United States of America). The conference was organized by a section of the committee. For more on the committee and the UNESCO History Project, see http://www.unesco.org/archives/new2010/en/scientific_committe.html (consulted 8 April 2011).

5 See, for example, the references to UNESCO in Hans Morgenthau, Politics among nations: the struggle for power and peace, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1948.

6 See Rothschild Emma, ‘The archives of universal history’, Journal of World History 19, 3, 2008, pp. 375401.

7 Summaries of the presentations can be found at the UNESCO History Project site. See, in particular, Madeleine Herren, who oversees a University of Heidelberg-based and European Union-funded research consortium studying Asia and Europe in a global context; Patricia Clavin from Oxford University, who is playing a pivotal role in the resuscitation of the history of the League of Nations; and Sandrine Kott, who is connected to the burgeoning historical work on the International Labour Organization.

8 These were Sunil Amrith’s closing remarks. See also Sunil Amrith and Glenda Sluga, ‘New histories of the UN’, Journal of World History, 19, 3, 2008, pp. 251–74.

9 Sunil Amrit, closing remarks at ‘Transnational History of International Organizations: Methodology/ Epistemology’ conference, King’s College, Cambridge, April 2009.

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Journal of Global History
  • ISSN: 1740-0228
  • EISSN: 1740-0236
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-global-history
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