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Notes on transitivity and theme in English: Part 2

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2008

M. A. K. Halliday
Affiliation:
Department of General Linguistics, University College, London W.C.1

Extract

Transitivity, mood and theme. Part I of this paper (sections 1–3) was an attempt to sketch some of the principal syntactic options, having the clause as point of origin, that are available to the speaker of English for the representation of processes and relations, and of objects, persons &c. as participants in them. The term ‘transitivity’ was used as a general label for this area of grammatical selection. Part II (sections 4–7) is concerned with another range of grammatical options, also associated with the clause, for which ‘theme’ is being used as the cover term.

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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1967

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References

REFERENCES

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