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Amorphization of graphite induced by mechanical milling and subsequent crystallization of the amorphous carbon upon heat treating

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

J. Tang*
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics and Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
W. Zhao
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics and Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
L. Li
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics and Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
A. U. Falster
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics and Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
W. B. Simmons Jr.
Affiliation:
Departments of Physics and Geology and Geophysics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana 70148
W. L. Zhou
Affiliation:
Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2–4–1 Mutsuno, Nagoya 456, Japan
Y. Ikuhara
Affiliation:
Japan Fine Ceramics Center, 2–4–1 Mutsuno, Nagoya 456, Japan
J. H. Zhang
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Xavier University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70125
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author.
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Abstract

The effects of mechanical milling (MM) on the phase transformation of graphite carbon were investigated using high resolution electron microscopy (HREM), x-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis (DTA). Amorphization of graphite as a result of prolonged high-energy ball milling was directly observed with HREM. The exothermic peak in the DTA trace of the ∼200 h ball-milled sample indicated a crystallization onset temperature of about 670 °C and crystallization activation energy of 234 kJ/mole.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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References

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