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Continuum modeling of dislocation plasticity: Theory, numerical implementation, and validation by discrete dislocation simulations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 March 2011

Stefan Sandfeld*
Affiliation:
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, IZBS—Institut für Zuverlässigkeit von Bauteilen und Systemen, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany
Thomas Hochrainer
Affiliation:
Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310
Michael Zaiser
Affiliation:
The University of Edinburgh, Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Edinburgh EH93JL, United Kingdom
Peter Gumbsch
Affiliation:
Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, IZBS—Institut für Zuverlässigkeit von Bauteilen und Systemen, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany; and Fraunhofer IWM, 79108 Freiburg, Germany
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: Stefan.sandfeld@kit.edu
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Abstract

Miniaturization of components and devices calls for an increased effort on physically motivated continuum theories, which can predict size-dependent plasticity by accounting for length scales associated with the dislocation microstructure. An important recent development has been the formulation of a Continuum Dislocation Dynamics theory (CDD) that provides a kinematically consistent continuum description of the dynamics of curved dislocation systems [T. Hochrainer, et al., Philos. Mag.87, 1261 (2007)]. In this work, we present a brief overview of dislocation-based continuum plasticity models. We illustrate the implementation of CDD by a numerical example, bending of a thin film, and compare with results obtained by three-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD) simulation.

Type
Invited Feature Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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