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Determining engineering stress–strain curve directly from the load–depth curve of spherical indentation test

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Baoxing Xu
Affiliation:
Columbia Nanomechanics Research Center, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027
Xi Chen*
Affiliation:
Columbia Nanomechanics Research Center, Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027; Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Korea; and School of Aerospace, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, China
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: xichen@columbia.edu
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Abstract

The engineering stress–strain curve is one of the most convenient characterizations of the constitutive behavior of materials that can be obtained directly from uniaxial experiments. We propose that the engineering stress–strain curve may also be directly converted from the load–depth curve of a deep spherical indentation test via new phenomenological formulations of the effective indentation strain and stress. From extensive forward analyses, explicit relationships are established between the indentation constraint factors and material elastoplastic parameters, and verified numerically by a large set of engineering materials as well as experimentally by parallel laboratory tests and data available in the literature. An iterative reverse analysis procedure is proposed such that the uniaxial engineering stress–strain curve of an unknown material (assuming that its elastic modulus is obtained in advance via a separate shallow spherical indentation test or other established methods) can be deduced phenomenologically and approximately from the load–displacement curve of a deep spherical indentation test.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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