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Finite element analysis of blister formation in laser-induced forward transfer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 August 2011

Nicholas T. Kattamis
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544
Matthew S. Brown
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544
Craig B. Arnold*
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: cbarnold@princeton.edu
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Abstract

Blister-actuated laser-induced forward transfer (BA-LIFT) is a direct-write technique, which enables high-resolution printing of sensitive inks for electronic or biological applications. During BA-LIFT, a polymer laser-absorbing layer deforms into an enclosed blister and ejects ink from an adjacent donor film. In this work, we develop a finite element model to replicate and predict blister expansion dynamics during BA-LIFT. Model inputs consist of standard mechanical properties, strain-rate-dependent material parameters, and a parameter encapsulating the thermal and optical properties of the film. We present methods to determine these material parameters from experimental measurements. The simulated expansion dynamics are shown to be in good agreement with experimental measurements using two different polymer layer thicknesses. Finally, the ability to model high-fluence blister rupture is demonstrated through a strain-based failure approach.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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