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High-temperature Creep Resistance in Rare-earth-doped, Fine-grained Al2O3

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

H. Yoshida
Affiliation:
Ceramic Materials Laboratory, Department of Material Science, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan
Y. Ikuhara
Affiliation:
Ceramic Materials Laboratory, Department of Material Science, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan
T. Sakuma
Affiliation:
Ceramic Materials Laboratory, Department of Material Science, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan
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Abstract

High-temperature creep in undoped Al2O3 and La2O3- or Y2O3- or Lu2O3-doped Al2O3 with a grain size of about 1 µm is examined in uniaxial compression testing at temperatures between 1150 and 1350 °C. The high-temperature creep resistance in Al2O3 is highly improved by the rare-earth oxide doping in the level of 0.045 mol %, and the creep rate is suppressed in the order La2O3 <Y2O3 <Lu2O3. Rare-earth ions in each doped Al2O3 are found to segregate in Al2O3 grain boundaries without forming amorphous phase or second-phase particles. The activation energy for creep in undoped Al2O3 is estimated to be 410 kJ/mol, while it is about 800 kJ/mol in the three rare-earth oxide-doped Al2O3. The grain boundary diffusivity must be highly reduced by the segregation of the dopant cation in Al2O3 grain boundaries.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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