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Preparation of a ZrO2–Al2O3 nanocomposite by high-pressure sintering of spray-pyrolyzed powders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

R. S. Mishra
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616
V. Jayaram
Affiliation:
Department of Metallurgy, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India
B. Majumdar
Affiliation:
Department of Metallurgy, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India
C. E. Lesher
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616
A. K. Mukherjee
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616
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Abstract

ZrO2–Al2O3 powders were synthesized by spray pyrolysis. These powders were sintered at 1 GPa in the temperature range of 700–1100 °C. The microstructural evolution and densification are reported in this paper. The application of 1 Gpa pressure lowers the crystallization temperature from ∼850 to <700 °C. Similarly, the transformation temperature under 1 GPa pressure for γ → α–Al2O3 reduces from ∼1100 to 700–800 °C range, and that for tm ZrO2 reduces from ∼1050 to 700–800 °C range. It was possible to obtain highly dense nanocrystalline ZrO2–Al2O3 composite at temperatures as low as 700 °C. The effect of high pressure on nucleation and transformation of phases is discussed.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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Preparation of a ZrO2–Al2O3 nanocomposite by high-pressure sintering of spray-pyrolyzed powders
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