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Production of customized hybrid porous structures by powder metallurgy of Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 glassy powders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 August 2013

Sergio Scudino*
Affiliation:
IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01171 Dresden, Germany
Jin Young Kim
Affiliation:
IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01171 Dresden, Germany
Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth
Affiliation:
IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01171 Dresden, Germany
Min Ha Lee
Affiliation:
Korea Institute for Rare Metals, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840, Korea
Bum Sung Kim
Affiliation:
Korea Institute for Rare Metals, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840, Korea
Uta Kühn
Affiliation:
IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01171 Dresden, Germany
Jürgen Eckert
Affiliation:
IFW Dresden, Institut für Komplexe Materialien, D-01171 Dresden, Germany; and TU Dresden, InstitutfürWerkstoffwissenschaft, D-01062 Dresden, Germany
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: s.scudino@ifw-dresden.de
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Abstract

Among the different porous materials, bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams are of special interest due to their high strength combined with large elastic limit. Large surface areas and, therefore, high reactivity in chemical applications can be achieved by properly adjusting the pore characteristics. Pore size and pore size distribution are the key factors for determining the overall performance of open-cell porous materials used for functional applications, such as filtration or catalysis. As a result, the control of these factors is a necessary requirement for material design and application. In this work, BMG foams are produced by powder metallurgy through the selective dissolution of a fugitive phase. The work is focused on the manufacturing processes needed to properly control pore size and pore size distribution. The results reveal that customized hybrid BMG porous structures can be produced through the controlled milling of the BMG-composite powders.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2013 

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Production of customized hybrid porous structures by powder metallurgy of Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 glassy powders
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