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Synthesis, characterization, and properties of nanophase TiO2

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

R. W. Siegel
Affiliation:
Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439
S. Ramasamy
Affiliation:
Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439
H. Hahn
Affiliation:
Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439
L. Zongquan
Affiliation:
Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439
L. Ting
Affiliation:
Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439
R. Gronsky
Affiliation:
National Center for Electron Microscopy, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720
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Abstract

Ultrafine-grained, nanophase samples of TiO2 (rutile) were synthesized by the gas-condensation method and subsequent in situ compaction. The samples were studied by a number of techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, Vickers microharness measurements, and positron annihilation spectroscopy, as a function of sintering temperature. The nanophase compacts with average initial grain sizes of 12 nm were found to densify rapidly above 500 °C, with only a small increase in grain size. The hardness values obtained by this method are comparable to or greater than those for coarser-grained compacts, but are achieved at temperatures 400 to 600 °C lower than conventional sintering temperatures and without the need for sintering aids.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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References

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