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Deformation behavior and energy absorption capability of polymer and ceramic-polymer composite microlattices under cyclic loading

  • Almut Schroer (a1), Jeffrey M. Wheeler (a2) and Ruth Schwaiger (a1)
Abstract

Specifically designed microlattices are able to combine outstanding mechanical and physical properties and, thus, expand the actual limits of the material property space. However, post-yield softening induced by plastic buckling or crushing of individual ligaments limits performance under cyclic loading, which affects their energy absorption capabilities. Understanding deformation under repeated loading is key to further optimizing these high-strength materials. While until now mainly hollow metallic microlattices and multistable or tailored buckling structures have been analyzed, this study investigates deformation and failure of polymer and ceramic-polymer microlattices under cyclic loading to understand the (i) influence of the microarchitecture and (ii) influence of processing conditions on the energy absorption capability. Despite fracture of individual struts, the stretching-dominated microarchitectures possess a superior behavior especially for larger cycle numbers. In combination with a specific annealing treatment of the polymer material, high recoverability and energy dissipation can be achieved.

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Corresponding author
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: ruth.schwaiger@kit.edu
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Contributing Editor: Katia Bertoldi

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References
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Journal of Materials Research
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