Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-xwjfq Total loading time: 0.615 Render date: 2023-02-01T02:46:28.572Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Experimental Study of Coal Pyrolysis and Gasification in Association with Syngas Combustion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2011

W.-H. Chen*
Affiliation:
Graduate Institute of Greenergy Technology, National University of Tainan, Tainan, Taiwan 70005, R.O.C.
J.-C. Chen*
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Fooyin University, Taliao, Kaohsiung Hsien, Taiwan 83102, R.O.C.
C.-D. Tsai*
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Fooyin University, Taliao, Kaohsiung Hsien, Taiwan 83102, R.O.C.
S.-W. Du*
Affiliation:
Steel and Aluminum Research and Development Department, China Steel Corporation, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 81233, R.O.C.
*
*Professor, corresponding author
**Associate Professor
***Graduate student
****Associate Scientist
Get access

Abstract

Coal pyrolysis and gasification incorporating synthesis gas (syngas) combustion are investigated experimentally in the present study. Two different coals are considered; one pertains to high-volatile bituminous and the other low-volatile one. For the pyrolysis, using thermogravimetry in association with mass spectrometry reveals that the concentrations of CO and CO2 increase with increasing temperature, whereas those of H2 and CH4 undergo increase followed by decrease. Regarding the gasification, the formations of the four gases between the two different coals are similar. However, when the reaction temperature is relatively low such as 800°C, carbon reactivity of the low-volatile coal decays in a significant way. Furthermore, with the reaction temperature of 1000°C the entire gasification histories of the two coals can be divided into five periods in accordance with syngas combustion. They are initiated, growing, rapidly decaying, progressively decaying, and frozen periods, sequentially. The flame is wrinkled in the growing and rapidly decaying periods where the reaction strength is much higher than that near extinction. When the reaction temperatures are 800 and 900°C, the growing and rapidly decaying periods tend to wither. Recognizing the syngas combustion characteristics, one is capable of figuring out the coal gasification process in more detail.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Society of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, R.O.C. 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Ristinen, R. A. and Kraushaar, J. J., Energy and the Environment, John Wiley and Sons, New York (2006).Google Scholar
2.Hinrichs, R. A. and Kleinbach, M, Energy: Its Use and the Environment, Harcourt, Orlando (2002).Google Scholar
3.Chow, J., Wopp, R. J. and Portney, P. R., “Energy Resources and Global Development,Science, 302, pp. 15281531 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Smoot, L. D. and Smith, P. J., Coal Combustion and Gasification, Plenum Press, New York (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.Smoot, L. D., Fundamentals for Coal Combustion: for Clean and Efficient Use, Elsevier, New York (1993).Google Scholar
6.Cheng, J., Zhou, J., Liu, J., Zhou, Z., Huang, Z., Cao, X., Zhao, X. and Cen, K., “Sulfur Removal at High Temperature During Coal Combustion in Furnaces: A Review,Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, 29, pp. 381405 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Chen, W. H., Chen, J. C., Tsai, C. D. and Jiang, T. L., “Transient Gasification and Syngas Formation for Coal Particles in a Fixed-Bed Reactor,International Journal of Energy Research, 31, pp. 895911 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Doe, U.S., Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally SoundEnergy for America's Future, May 2002.Google Scholar
9.MacLeana, H. L. and Laveb, L. B., “Evaluating Automobile Fuel/Propulsion System Technologies,” Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, 29, pp. 169 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.Souza, J. M. T. and Rangel, M. C., “Catalytic Activity of Aluminum-Rich Hematite in the Water Gas Shift Reaction,” Reaction Kinetics and Catalysis Letters, 83 pp. 9398 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11.Chen, W. H. and Jheng, J. G., “Characterization of Water Gas Shift Reaction in Association with Carbon Sequestration,” Journal of Power Sources, 172, pp. 368375 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Turner, J. A., “Sustainable Hydrogen Production,” Science, 305, pp. 972974 (2004).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13.Elliott, M. A., Chemistry of Coal Utilization, Wiley, New York (1981).Google Scholar
14.Hessley, R. K., Reasoner, J. W. and Riley, J. T., Coal Science: An Introduction to Chemistry, Technology, and Utilization, John Wiley and Sons, New York (1986).Google Scholar
15.Ohtsuka, Y. and Wu, Z., “Nitrogen Release During Fixed-Bed Gasification of Several Coals with CO2 Factors Controlling Formation of N2,” Fuel, 78, pp. 521527 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16.Sheth, A., Yeboah, Y. D., Godavarty, A., Xu, Y. and Agrawal, P. K., “Catalytic Gasification of Coal Using Eutectic Salts: Reaction Kinetics with Binary and Ternary Eutectic Catalysts,” Fuel, 82, pp. 305317 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Ocampo, A., Arenas, E., Chejne, F., Espinel, J., Londono, C., Aguirre, J. and Perez, J.D., “An Experimental Study on Gasification of Colombian Coal in Fluidised Bed,” Fuel, 82, pp. 161164 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Lee, J. G., Kim, J. H., Lee, H. J., Park, T. J. and Kim, S. D., “Characteristics of Entrained Flow Coal Gasification in a Drop Tube Reactor,” Fuel, 75, pp. 10351042 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19.Choi, Y. C., Li, X. Y., Park, T. J., Kim, J. H. and Lee, J. G., “Numerical Study on the Coal Gasification Characteristics in an Entrained Flow Coal Gasifier,” Fuel, 80, pp. 21932201 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20.Skodras, G., Kaldis, S. P., Sakellaropoulos, G. P., Sofialidis, D. and Faltsi, O., “Simulation of a Molten Bath Gasifier by Using a CFD Code,” Fuel, 82, pp. 20332044 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21.Du, S. W. and Chen, W. H., “Numerical Simulation and Practical Improvement of Pulverized Coal Combustion in Blast Furnace”, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, 33, pp. 327334 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Experimental Study of Coal Pyrolysis and Gasification in Association with Syngas Combustion
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Experimental Study of Coal Pyrolysis and Gasification in Association with Syngas Combustion
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Experimental Study of Coal Pyrolysis and Gasification in Association with Syngas Combustion
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *