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Economic growth, rural assets and prosperity: exploring the implications of a 20-year record of asset growth in Tanzania

  • Dan Brockington (a1), Olivia Howland (a1), Vesa-Matti Loiske (a2), Moses Mnzava (a3) and Christine Noe (a3)...
Abstract

Measures of poverty based on consumption suggest that recent economic growth in many African countries has not been inclusive, particularly in rural areas. We argue that measures of poverty using assets may provide a different picture. We present data based on recent re-surveys of Tanzanian households first visited in the early 1990s. These demonstrate a marked increase in prosperity from high levels of poverty. It does not, however, follow that these improvements derive from GDP growth. We consider the implications of this research for further explorations of the relationship between economic growth and agricultural policy in rural areas.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Corresponding author
Emails: d.brockington@sheffield.ac.uk and oliviahowland@googlemail.com
Email: vesa-matti.loiske@sh.se
Emails: moses.emanuel@gmail.com and cnpallangyo@gmail.com
Footnotes
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The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the DfID ESRC Growth Research Programme (ES/L012413/2) which has funded this research project and of the Research Council of Norway which has supported this work through the Greenmentality project. We are grateful to the University of Manchester for supporting Brockington's sabbatical research, to two anonymous reviewers for their incisive and supportive comments on an earlier MS and to the residents of Gitting and Gocho for answering our questions and discussing the findings with us.

Footnotes
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