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Associations between self-reported vegetable and fruit intake assessed with a new web-based 24-h dietary recall and serum carotenoids in free-living adults: a relative validation study

  • J. Lafrenière (a1), C. Couillard (a1), B. Lamarche (a1), C. Laramée (a1), M. C. Vohl (a1) and S. Lemieux (a1)...

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to assess the relative validity of a new web-based 24-h dietary recall (R24W) in terms of vegetable and fruit (VF) intake assessment using serum carotenoid concentrations as reference biomarkers. A total of seventy-four women and seventy-three men (mean age 47·5 (sd 13·3) years; mean BMI 25·5 (sd 4·4) kg/m2) completed the R24W four times to assess their VF intake. Serum carotenoids were obtained from 12-h fasted blood samples and measured by HPLC. Raw and de-attenuated partial Spearman's correlations were performed to determine how usual vegetable and/or fruit intake was associated with serum carotenoids. Relevant confounders were selected using a stepwise regression analysis. Finally, cross-classification was used to determine agreement between intake of VF and serum carotenoids. Intake of total dietary carotenoids was significantly associated (r 0·40; P < 0·01) with total serum carotenoids (without lycopene). Total VF intake was also associated with total serum carotenoid concentrations without lycopene (r 0·44; P < 0·01). HDL-cholesterol, waist circumference and age were identified as confounders in the association between total VF intake and total serum carotenoids (without lycopene). De-attenuated partial correlation adjusted for these confounders increased the associations between dietary carotenoids and total serum carotenoids without lycopene (r 0·49; P < 0·01) and between total VF intake and total serum carotenoids without lycopene (r 0·48; P < 0·01). Almost 80 % of respondents were classified in the same or the adjacent quartile for total VF intake and total serum carotenoids without lycopene, while less than 6 % were classified in the opposite quartile. Overall, these observations support the appropriateness of the R24W to assess the dietary intake of VF.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

*Corresponding author: S. Lemieux, email Simone.lemieux@fsaa.ulaval.ca

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