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Coffee and beverages are the major contributors to polyphenol consumption from food and beverages in Japanese middle-aged women

  • Yoichi Fukushima (a1), Takeshi Tashiro (a1), Akiko Kumagai (a1), Hiroyuki Ohyanagi (a1), Takumi Horiuchi (a2), Kazuhiro Takizawa (a2), Norie Sugihara (a3), Yoshimi Kishimoto (a3), Chie Taguchi (a3), Mariko Tani (a3) and Kazuo Kondo (a3)...

Abstract

Food and beverages rich in polyphenols have been shown to reduce the risk of non-communicable diseases. The present study estimated polyphenol levels and consumption from food and beverages in Japanese women. Randomly recruited housewives living in the area around Tokyo (n 109; aged 21–56 years; Group 1) recorded all beverages and foods they ingested for 7 d, and the total polyphenol (TP) consumption was estimated based on the TP content of each item measured with a modified Folin–Ciocalteu method. For Group 1, TP was consumed at 841 (sd 403) mg/d (range 113–1759 mg/d), and beverages were a larger source of TP (79 %) than food (21 %). The largest single source of TP was coffee at 47 %, followed by green tea, black tea, chocolate, beer and soya sauce, at 16, 5·7, 3·3, 3·2 and 3·1 %, respectively. In terms of food groups, cereals/noodles, vegetables, fruits, beans and seeds, and seasonings (except for soya sauce) contributed 5·0, 4·0, 1·4, 1·8 and 2·4 %, respectively. Another group of housewives who consumed at least one cup of coffee per d were separately recruited (n 100; Group 2) in the same area. Their consumption of TP was higher at 1187 (sd 371) mg/d (range 440–2435 mg/d) than Group 1 (P < 0·001), and the difference mostly came from the coffee consumption. We conclude that not food but beverages, especially coffee, may be the major contributor to TP consumption in Japanese women.

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The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license .

Corresponding author

* Corresponding author: Dr Yoichi Fukushima, fax +41 21 785 8308, email yoichi.fukushima@jp.nestle.com

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Keywords

Coffee and beverages are the major contributors to polyphenol consumption from food and beverages in Japanese middle-aged women

  • Yoichi Fukushima (a1), Takeshi Tashiro (a1), Akiko Kumagai (a1), Hiroyuki Ohyanagi (a1), Takumi Horiuchi (a2), Kazuhiro Takizawa (a2), Norie Sugihara (a3), Yoshimi Kishimoto (a3), Chie Taguchi (a3), Mariko Tani (a3) and Kazuo Kondo (a3)...

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